The Importance Of Technology In Education

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A review of the literature in K-12 education supports the idea that technology has the ability to enhance learning amongst and between teachers and students. However, Petko (2012) explains, despite the increasing availability of technology in schools, rarely is such technology used for teaching and learning. As such, a gap exists in K-12 schools between the technology available to teachers and meaningful integration into classroom instruction and PD (Gray, Thomas, & Lewis, 2010). Hew and Brush (2007) discern that both classroom instruction and teacher development are generally affected by a number of prevalent barriers. Accordingly, at least 123 barriers have been identified in past studies precipitating the gap between technology and…show more content…
(2010) report “less than half of the 3000 surveyed teachers reported using technology often during instructional time” (p. 1109). In fact, technology was primarily used for non academic purposes including grading and attendance. Similar academic studies describe other non-instructional tasks involving technology used by teachers include communicating with colleagues and parents or classroom material preparation (Kopcha, 2010; Russell, Bebell, O’Dwyer, & O’Connor, 2003; Zhao, Pugh, Sheldon, & Byers, 2002). Likewise, McCormick and Scrimshaw (2001) argue “technology is used more as “efficiency aids and extension devices” (McCormick & Scrimshaw, 2001, p. 31). Meanwhile, attempts to develop pedagogy involving digital resources often lack relevance and…show more content…
Petko (2012) comments that the challenges associated with technology integration in schools cannot be solved by removing existing barriers, and increasing the enablers correlating with increased use of technology. In contrast, as outlined by Mumtaz (2000), the more critical challenge involves addressing the complex interplay of variables associated with various levels within a school. Such levels include the individual level (teachers and students), the school level (administration, professional development and academic leadership, school culture), and the educational system level (academic policies and curricula). Notwithstanding such complicated organizational challenges, Petko (2012) writes “Yet despite this complexity, there appears to be a fairly broad consensus that emphasizes the teacher’s individual qualities, and, above all, pedagogical beliefs” (p. 1352). Similarly, Ertmer (2013) argues that teacher’s beliefs and attitude toward the benefits of technology are the most vital component of successful technology integration. As such Hammond, Fragkouli, Suandi, Crosson, Ingram, Johnston-Wilder, and Wray (2009) contend that PD is a critical element in developing teachers’ use of technology toward innovative pedagogy. However, as the outlined research shows, a
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