The Diminishing Southern Code in William Faulkner's The Unvanquished

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The Diminishing Southern Code in William Faulkner's The Unvanquished In the novel The Unvanquished, by William Faulkner, most of the characters strictly follow by a code of laws and moral values called the Southern Code. At the beginning of the book, the characters follow the Southern Code more strictly than at the end. Some of the rules which start to diminish during the course of the novel are as follows: no stealing, no profanity, no lying, treat women and the elderly with respect, and seek revenge on those who have caused you pain. The characters obey these during the start of the novel, and eventually as the novel progresses, the rules are broken. The first two rules, no profanity and no lying, are the first two to be broken in the book. In the first chapter, the character Granny visibly and strictly abides by the Southern Code. The main character, Bayard, and his friend Ringo sprint towards their family's house after they have shot a Yankee with their father's gun. Bayard retorts, "We shot him Granny. We shot the bastud!" (Faulkner 27). Proceeding this, Granny applies soap to each of the boys' mouths as a punishment for uttering the word "bastud" . Granny does this because she strictly obeys the Southern Code no matter what the circumstance. Nevertheless, Granny eventually breaks the code by lying to a Yankee colonel. She tells him, in response to the colonel's question that "There are no children in this house nor on this place." (Faulkner 28) The colonel...

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