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The Benefits Of Prison

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Prison sentences are intended, in part, to force an individual to pay his debt to society. This debt was incurred through the crime committed, and the sentence for that crime is imposed as a means of punishment for the individual. After they are released from prison, they have paid their debt to society. Sometimes the release is supervised, and specific conditions are set by the court system. Under other circumstances, an individual has served their entire sentence, including time under supervised release. It is in this case that a convict should be able to reenter civilian life, with the help of the “correctional system,” as a productive member of society. The rehabilitative goals of corrections provide that a felon will have the means…show more content…
The answer is complicated: Housing is not the only roadblock faced by felons. Convicts are also banned from receiving government grants and many scholarship opportunities, which limits their ability to obtain a higher education. The ability for many people to succeed in society today is dependent upon their level of education. Those who are serving time in a penitentiary might have access to a degree, but many do not. Upon release, they find themselves struggling to earn the degree they so desire. Policymakers could adjust this restriction appropriately. Current guidelines are set for the eligibility of government financial aid for college. Certain time frames are allowed for each degree, and when one goes over said time frames, their aid stops. Income restrictions are also in place. It is possible to allow felons to receive aid under stricter guidelines than the general public. They might be required to have a certain number of hours of community service or sustained employment in order to qualify. Felons might also be obligated to first attend a community college and obtain an associate’s degree. Aid after this degree could be limited to use at a state institution as opposed to a private educational facility. These restrictions would enable convicts to earn their higher education while still limiting potential waste or abuse of the…show more content…
Once again “no longer locked up, just locked out,” our narrator is ignored by congressmen as he attempts to address the difficulties faced by convicts because legislatures do not consider him to be part of their constituency. Those in penitentiaries are considered less-than the general public in many ways. They are forced to work for miniscule pay and are limited in their behaviors. Penitentiary residents do not have access to many items that the general public has the ability to purchase. They are also not allowed the same freedoms in the aspect of legal drugs and substances, (i.e. alcohol and tobacco). Finally, they are not allowed to vote. Ideally, upon release, these things change. Convicts are able to find employment, (usually with the assistance of a program such as Vocational Rehabilitation or another social service agency) that will pay minimum wage. They can resume their addiction to tobacco, although they might not be allowed to consume alcohol under their court-ordered restrictions. Laws concerning voting rights vary from state to state, which is what makes this struggle difficult to discuss. Some states allow voting while in prison (Maine and Vermont), while others (13 states and the District of Columbia) allow voting after one is released from prison (Felon Voting). Four states return the right to vote after an individual is released and has