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Success In Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead

analytical Essay
786 words
786 words
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Success is defined as the favorable or desired outcome, and in some ways it’s regarded as the attainment of wealth, favor, or eminence. (Merriam-Webster). Under the circumstances of Howard Roark and Peter Keating in Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead, their personal views of success contrast differently and are obtained in separate but ultimately satisfactory outcomes. While Keating is a go-getter and prefers to aim high, Roark is wholesomely content that his plans, his and his only, are coming to life. However, due to the spiraling society and persistent influence on these two, they’re ultimately torn by the backlash of American norm and what really is “true” contemporary architecture. Peter Keating’s line to success is an open road, where any choice he makes gives him the opportunity to soar. Scouters flocked to him before he received his college diploma, he was successful before he even got a job. Being the star athlete of Stanton, young and attractive, and graduating with high …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Compares howard roark and peter keating in ayn rand's the fountainhead. their personal views of success contrast differently and are obtained in separate but ultimately satisfactory outcomes.
  • Explains that peter keating's line to success is an open road, where any choice he makes gives him the opportunity to soar.
  • Analyzes how roark, an individualist, hates commercial success. he is adamant for his radical modern architecture, which is an anti-trend to the traditional style many of his colleagues are accustomed to.
  • Analyzes how both characters are terrifyingly similar due to their selfishness. keating's immediate success drives him to arrogance and pride, belittling others who cannot appreciate his revelations.
  • Analyzes how keating has an underlying "worship" to roark because of his lack of confidence in his own work and falls as a parasite to society.
  • Analyzes how roark was portrayed as his own success and respected by experts that initially shunned him. he was insistent and self-appraising, and didn't need a board to determine whether his drafts were worthy.

Keating’s immediate success drives him to arrogance and pride, belittling others who cannot appreciate his revelations. Power was his enemy, and it drove him to extremes where he couldn’t find confidence in his own work. He ultimately suffers from denying his own mediocrity and deeming a sensible, happy life not good enough. Unfortunately, his dependence upon his audience causes him to fall weak. Unlike Keating, Roark’s strength stems from himself. Roark builds for the sake of seeing his ideas erected (684) despite the rest of society being disgusted by his buildings. This leads to the destruction of Cortlant in the hands of the creator, claiming that he wouldn’t let it exist due to it’s last minute manipulation. Even if he got no commision out of it, recognition or promotion as long as it was “My work done my way.” (579). In the end, his natural ability and drive for standing his ground turned his life

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