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Should the Developed North Increase Aid to the Less Developed South?

analytical Essay
1500 words
1500 words
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Should the Developed North Increase Aid to the Less Developed South?

The question at hand is not whether aid from the developed north should be given at all, but whether or not it should be increased to help ease the suffering of the developing countries in the south. Every country, whether rich or poor, should have compassion for the suffering. However, it is not the duty of the developed north to completely take care of every developing country. In the present, there are serious problems that need to be addressed dealing with how aid is given out: misuse of funds by governments, the corruption it creates, economies it destroys, lack of votes it buys at the United Nations, and finally the question of who has priority. Therefore, until these issues are dealt with in the near future, aid should be kept to a minimum.

· Response to Readings in Taking Sides

James P. Grant, in his article favoring the increase of foreign aid to the developing south, notes that poverty in this world is a large problem that has continued to rise for years. It wasn?t until the 1960?s that the mobilization of medical help, better sanitation, clean water, money spent on education, and other measures began to save lives and make the quality of living better for millions. However, he also states that even though aid is being provided, it is still not enough, and leaders like the United States and the European community should take the initiative to donate and assist more each year just like the Japanese have done. The only problem with this statement is that both the European community and the United States are pressed for money. The European countries, especially leaders like Great Britain and Germany, have devoted much of their aid b...

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..., but it makes sense if you look at the reasons why. Wealthier countries are more productive, stable, and offer a more educated workforce from which foreign investors have more to gain from. All of these examples together support the notion that aid is not always as useful as it could be and that lender?s should find more appropriate means for distributing resources before increasing foreign assistance budgets.

In conclusion, if only there was a way to prevent the misuse of funds by finding ways to control the use of money, increase support at the United Nations for US policies, and distribute aid according to need, then the increase of foreign aid would be acceptable. However, until that point, any increase in foreign aid is nothing more than a waste of money into the hands of the corrupt and a method to destroy the countries in which money is flowing into.

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that it is not the duty of the developed north to completely take care of every developing country.
  • Analyzes how james p. grant's article favors the increase of foreign aid to the developing south, stating that poverty in this world is a large problem that has continued to rise.
  • Opines that the purpose of a nation is to look after its citizens to ensure that they are free from harm, stay healthy, receive public utilities, and become educated.
  • Explains that the editors of the economist believe the north should not increase aid to the developing south on account of past misuse, unfair distribution of aid among countries, and lack of results.
  • Analyzes how the agency for international development (aid) believes that foreign aid influences recipients' actions and helps gain support for the donor's interests worldwide.
  • Analyzes the flaws in the assistance effort that need to be addressed before any future increase in spending occurs.
  • Opines that the key to reforming agencies like aid is finding a way to control the direction of monetary aid once lent to the government.
  • Opines that the clinton administration believed that assistance prevented social collapse. however, it was not worth the millions of dollars to interfere in the conflict in rwanda and somalia.
  • Argues that aid is not distributed based on need, but rather on wealth, which implies that foreign investors care more about their personal gain than for the betterment of the lives of those they govern.
  • Concludes that if there was a way to prevent the misuse of funds by finding ways to control the use of money, increase support at the united nations for us policies, and distribute aid according to need, foreign aid would be acceptable.
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