Political Interpretation In The Grimm Brothers's Little Red Cap

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Reader 's cast themselves upon the printed word in quest of the fleeting mode by which to extract oneself from the terrors of existence. Naturally, authors have monotonously impinged upon the reader 's mind; penetrating the cabinets and peering underneath the bed covers, in an endeavor to extract what one dreads. Although The Grimm Brothers’ Little Red Cap appears benevolent upon the facade, concealed within the subtext comprises the author’s political agenda; thus weaving that which frightens the reader and the author’s political rhetoric within the same ledger. Subversively, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm have employed this tactic in order to push forth their anti-semitic ideology: that the Jewish people embody the wolf rapping at the door. Furthermore,…show more content…
Specifically, the reader is actually placed in the ubiquitous shoes of Little Red Cap by way of the fairy tale structure. The narrative of Little Red Cap indicates that the reader is an innocent child whilst intravenously inserting the reader into the very substance of Little Red Cap. Likewise, the Grimm Brothers begin Little Red Cap with the lines “One upon a time there was a sweet little girl. Everyone who saw her liked her, but most of all her grandmother.” These first lines are assembled in a fashion to disarm the reader, thus permitting the narrative to assimilate an individual into the very shoes of the protagonist, who has no individuality apart from her little red cap. Furthermore, the narrative remarks upon innocence while juxtaposing its ignorance to the evils of the world, as the narrative manifest worldly evils into the embodiment of the wolf, who represents the distant other. Furthermore, the narrative capitalizes upon reader’s fear, as the wolf towers above the individual. Thus, continuing the narrative that the distant other is generally slanted to producing chaos. The narrative 's theme of ignorance compounds, when Little Red Cap’s mother tells her to “behave yourself on the way and do not leave the path,” thus compelling the reader to assume a sentry status, as those who wish to injure the reader come in many forms and are prowling…show more content…
As the reader frolics in the flowers, the wolf races to Grandmother’s home by masking his voice as Little Red Cap’s, the wolf tricks Grandmother into opening the door. Further, the anti-Semitic symbolism of the wolf takes the central stage as he knocks on the door within the lines, “the wolf ran straight to the grandmother’s house and knocked on the door. ‘Who’s there?’ ‘Little Red Cap. I’m bringing you some cake and wine. Open the door.” The wolf depicts repulsive characteristics, as he not only deceives a Little Red Cap into abandoning the route but also imitates her, thus obtaining passage into the Grandmother’s home. Observing Little Red Cap as a manifestation of the reader, then one could morph the form of the wolf into the design of anything that the reader contemplates as the distant other. Furthermore, not only is the reader ascertained to be small but also a fool, who is hoodwinked into one’s own demise. Little Red Cap provides away knowledge that places both herself and family members’ lives in peril, thus portraying the mental deficiency of the reader in relation to the superior wolf. Also, glancing towards the simplistic symbolism of the wolf knocking at the door, one could deduct that the wolf is emblematic of the Jewish population
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