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Physician Assisted Suicide

argumentative Essay
1259 words
1259 words
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As recently the New Mexico judge allowed the physician to aid the dying of the patients that has the terminally illness, the state of New Mexico will potentially become the 5th state in the United States after Oregon, Washington, Montana and Vermont. This issue soon become the most eye-catching issues recently and brought up the debate of such issue along with the medical ethics, religions and human rights that was already goes along for decades, and this article will contain the argument that why should the physician-assisted suicide along with its’ legitimate and voluntarily practice should be justified from the perspective of the autonomy of the patients and it’s incununous to the society under current circumstances.

Definition of physician-assisted suicide
It’s hard to recognize the outcome and have an objective view about certain issue without knowing what is its’ actual definition. The definition of physician-assisted suicide is “when a person - typically someone suffering from an incurable illness or chronic intense pain - intentionally kills him/herself with the help of a doctor. A doctor may prescribe drugs on the understanding that the patient intends to use them to take a fatal overdose; or a doctor may insert an intravenous needle into the arm of a patient, who then pushes a switch to trigger a fatal injection”( ETHICAL DEBATE: On the horns of a dilemma.).
People usually are unable to distinguish the physician-assisted suicide from the euthanasia. In fact, “assisted suicide differs from euthanasia, which is when someone other than the patient ends the patient's life as painlessly as possible out of mercy. Euthanasia may be active, such as when a doctor gives a lethal injection to a patient. It can also be passive, ...

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...of Family Caregivers Support the Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide." Mental Health Weekly Digest. 17 Jun. 2013: 75. eLibrary. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
"ETHICAL DEBATE: On the horns of a dilemma." Chemist & Druggist. 03 Dec. 2005: 30. eLibrary. Web. 20 Jan. 2014.
Horgan, John., Johnson, Johnny.. "Trends in Healthcare: Seeking a Better Way to Die." Scientific American 276. (1997):100-105. eLibrary. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.
McCormick, J, Andrew.. "Self-Determination, the Right to Die, and Culture: A Literature Review." Social Work 2(2011):119. eLibrary. Web. 20 Jan. 2014.
Steinbrook, Robert. "Physician-assisted suicide in Oregon--an uncertain future." New England Journal of Medicine 6(2002):460. eLibrary. Web. 17 Jan. 2014.
"Suicide; No Evidence Physician Assisted Death Leads to "Slippery Slope"." Mental Health Weekly Digest. 08 Oct. 2007: 41. eLibrary. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.

In this essay, the author

  • Argues that physician-assisted suicide should be justified from the perspective of autonomy of the patients and incununity to the society.
  • Explains the definition of physician-assisted suicide. it's hard to recognize the outcome and have an objective view about certain issue without knowing its' actual definition.
  • Explains that assisted suicide differs from euthanasia, which is when someone else ends the patient's life as painlessly as possible out of mercy.
  • Explains that the actual practice physician assisted suicide must be done by the patient himself rather than the physician, which means the involuntary practice and abuse of such practice is unlikely.
  • Argues that the legalization of physician-assisted suicide could be beneficial to the majority of people if they could make such choice when they feel like necessary.
  • Opines that the right of life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness is unalienable and should not be prohibited by law.
  • Opines that the outcome of the policy in such region could be great reference to make the decision that should this law be adapted and how to set up the law to regulate such practice.
  • Compares the death with dignity act with the "slippery slope" suggested by the people who opposed the legalization of physician-assisted suicide.
  • Explains that in the netherlands, both assisted suicide and euthanasia are legal. the patient must be suffering unbearably and have no hope of improvement.
  • Explains that the netherlands has 9,700 requests to die annually, of which 3,800 receive euthanasia, and assisted suicide accounts for 2.5 per cent of all deaths.
  • Concludes that the article demonstrated that physician-assisted suicide is not only innocuous to entire society, but also beneficial to the people that need such service.
  • Explains that more than 65% of family caregivers support the legalization of physician- assisted suicide.
  • Explains that self-determination, the right to die, and culture: a literature review.
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