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Nightmare- a 10 year old Quarter Horse Gelding

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Case study #1: Nightmare a 10 year old Quarter Horse gelding
HISTORY AND PRESENTATION: Nightmare presented for evaluation of his poor appetite and poor manure production. He has been uninterested in food for three days or more prior to his arrival. He has been treated in the field 2 days or more prior. He was referred for suspected gastric ulcers or mild colic. There was no improvement in appetite despite Banamine, nasogastric intubation with mineral oil and water, and anti-ulcer medication. He had not defecated for 24 hours. He had never acted colicky or uncomfortable. Nightmare had no history of exposure to toxic plants or any other toxic substances. He was up-to-date on vaccinations with no history of any illness.
PHYSICAL EXAM:
• Attitude: Quiet and lethargic on arrival
• Body condition score: 5/9 (ideal)
• Temperature: normal (100.4 F)
• Heart rate: normal (36 bpm)
• Respiratory rate: normal (16 bpm)
• Mucus membranes: pink and moist
• CRT: <2
• Peripheral pulse strength: normal
• Boriborigmi: Decreased on the left, present and tympanic on the right
DIAGNOSTICS:
Blood work: Complete blood count: Within normal limits. No evidence of anemia or infection.
Chemistry Panel: Within normal limits except for a mildly elevated total bilirubin.
Induction: Administered 100mg xylazine along with 3mg butorphanol to allow for an oral examination and other diagnostic tests.
Oral Exam: No foreign bodies, ulcerations, abscesses, or masses were seen in the oral cavity. There were no dental abnormalities noted.
Rectal Exam: A small amount of pasty, mineral oil covered feces was present in the rectum. The GI tract was empty on palpation, and no other abnormalities were palpable.
Ab Ultrasound: There was small intestine visible in the...

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...to fully evaluate the stomach for any other underlying issues that can be affecting motility. Horses with gastric impactions should be fed small meals of soaked, small fiber size pellets for 4-6 weeks. Encourage hydration and treat any known underlying cause. This is very important in preventing recurrence.

References
McGonnell & GillattEquine Veterinary Practice Ltd Dedicated horse vets covering all areas of equine medicine 24 hour telephone: 01488 657575. (n.d.). Horse vets equine veterinary surgeons McGonnell & Gillatt Berkshire Hampshire Wiltshire Oxfordshire England. Retrieved April 8, 2014, from http://www.horse-vets.co.uk
TheHorse: Your Guide to Equine Health Care | TheHorse.com. (n.d.). TheHorse: Your Guide to Equine Health Care | TheHorse.com. Retrieved April 8, 2014, from http://www.thehorse.com

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