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Monroe Doctrine Dbq

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72. The Monroe Doctrine was a U.S foreign policy regarding domination of the American continent. It stated that further efforts by European nations to colonize land or interfere with states North or South America would be viewed as acts of aggression, requiring U.S. intervention. At the same time, the doctrine noted that the United States would neither interfere with existing European colonies nor meddle in internal concerns of European countries. 73. Andrew Jackson won a plurality of electoral votes in the election of 1824, but still lost to John Quincy Adams when the election was deferred to the House of Representatives. Jackson believed that Adams stole the election by being in cahoots with one of the house representatives. Jackson out voted Adams but since neither of them met the 130 electoral votes required to win presidency, the decision was sent to the House of Representatives. In 1828 Jackson's…show more content…
The Eaton Affair was a U.S. scandal involving members of President Andrew Jackson Cabinet and their wives. Although it was private matter, it affected the political careers of several men. Adultery was looked down upon because of the heavy presence of religious views. 75. The spoil system is the practice in which the political party winning an election rewards its campaign workers and other active supporters by appointment to government posts and by other favors 76. In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nation was forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River and to migrate to an area in present day Oklahoma. The cherokee people called this journey the " Trail of Tears", because of it devastating effects. 77.Calhoun had suggested that the doctrine of nullification could lead to secession. Calhoun authored an essay named " South Carolina Exposition and Protest", which argued that a state could veto any federal law that went beyond the enumerated powers and encroached upon the residual powers of the
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