Fourteen Precepts Of The Order Of Peace By Dalai Gandhi

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Traditionally, Buddhism is known primarily as a peaceful religion, but what techniques and resources do Buddhists use to be so peaceful with their actions? One technique they amplify is nonviolence; this means solving conflict in a manner that does not use any type of violence. The next technique Buddhists use for peace is suffering, including understanding and accepting suffering altogether. Peace activist Thich Nhat Hanh describes suffering as a way to “become a bell of mindfulness” (Hanh, 2001). The third technique for peace that Buddhists use is the Fourteen Precepts of the Order of Interbeing; these are fourteen guidelines, similar to the Ten Commandments, that are rules to live by to access the highest level of belief and to reach…show more content…
This statement that Dalai Lama delivers reveals so much about his character as a peace activist leaning towards the direction of nonviolence and peace between all types of religions, cultures and societies. Dalai Lama was honored to win and accept the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts in promoting peace and nonviolence in the Buddhist religious movement. Dalai Lama is a monk from Tibet who is known for his love, compassion and nonviolence, which he practices (Lama, 1989). During his acceptance speech, he expresses that he accepts his award not only for himself, but also as a tribute to those who have promoted world peace and nonviolence before him, one including Mahatma Gandhi. Dalai Lama also states that Gandhi is someone who he looks up to as an inspiration and someone who has taught him many life long lessons, including more than just…show more content…
These are important guidelines to live life in an appropriate Buddhist way. The first precept is to not be attached to any one doctrine or theory, even Buddhist ones (Hanh, n.d). The second precept is to avoid being close-minded and be ready and open to learn new things. The third precept is to not force beliefs on others, let others decide their religious views on their own. The fourth precept is to not avoid suffering, accept it and learn from it (Hanh, n.d). Do not be selfish with money or belongings are included in the fifth precept of the Order of Interbeing. The sixth precept is to not be angry or hold a grudge for too long because it hurts relationships and is not healthy. The art of practicing breathing (yoga) and to be a peace with personal surroundings is included in the seventh precept. The eighth and ninth precept are very similar, the eighth precept is to not say things that can affect the community in a negative way and the ninth precept is to not tell a lie, gossip untruthful things and to always have courage to speak their opinions (Hanh, n.d). The tenth precept is to not boast in the Buddhist community, especially for personal gain. To live a life with a career that does not harm individuals in any way is the eleventh precept. The twelfth precept is do not kill and do not let anyone else kill, this precept also goes along with the nonviolence factor (Hanh,
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