Feminist Literature

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Feminist literature is a broad term politically describing the role of women, and how they came to be activists in their pursuit of liberal freedom. The term feminism has been around for years, correlating with the movement of women’s aptitude to find a way in life and basically as in “The Awakening” such as Edna did, a voice. “Feminism is a belief that women should fight for their equal rights, powers and opportunities as men do,” (Cambridge Dictionary). The antagonistic nature of the women in the Victorian period was to bring many changes in their lifestyle, and not follow the norm of the traditions and values in that time. This burning desire, to become free, emancipated, liberal, and to be able to speak freely of their thoughts was unsettling to many, and this resulted in several feminist movements, one being the Seneca Falls Convention which was the revolution of Women’s Conferences which then lead to female independence. “The Awakening” by Kate Chopin, connects with feminist literature because the author is trying to portray the life style Edna has made for her self and how she realizes her independence after she succumbs to the tradition of marriage. Chopin examines the principals of the female characters in their work and household duties and how they exemplify their lives around the issues women faced during the Victorian period. To put it simply, women in the Victorian period grew up with just one mind set, with only one view. This view pertained to being a good housewife and above all a noble mother. The women of this time period believed that life was sinful to think of their pleasure or emotions above any one else’s. The Victorian Era was the time of the British rule of Queen Victoria, and how during her time pe... ... middle of paper ... ... Works Cited Chopin, Kate. “The Awakening: An Authoritative Text. Biographical and Historical Contexts.” Ed. Margo Culley. New York: W.W. Norton, 1994. Print Chametzky, Jules. “[Edna and the “Women Question”]” The Awakening: An Authoritative Text. Biographical and Historical Contexts. Ed. Margo Culley. New York: W.W. Norton, 1994. 221-222. Print. Fletcher, Marie. “[The Southern Women in Fiction]” The Awakening: An Authoritative Text. Biographical and Historical Contexts. Ed. Margo Culley. New York: W.W. Norton, 1994. 193-195. Print. Kelly, Martin. “Seneca Falls Convention: Background and Details” American History. Aboutweb. 2011. Schlereth, Thomas J. “Victorian America: Transformations in Everyday Life, 1875-1915.” New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 1991. Print. Yalom, Marilyn. “A History of the Wife” New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 2001. Print.
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