Ethnic Diversity Case Study

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One. NZ Ethnic Diversity. Some 15 years ago “bi-ethnic” may have been an appropriate expression for NZ’s ethnic makeup, but now “multi-ethnic” would now be a more accurate description due mainly to changing immigration patterns. Also, intermarriage has meant more dual-ethnicity. Our 2013 census showed our residential population to be European 71.2%, Maori 14.1%, Asian 11.3%, Pacific peoples 7.6%, Middle Eastern, Latin American, African 1.1%, other 1.6%, not stated or unidentified 5.4% (Index Mundi, n.d.). Statistics NZ ethnic projections indicate a 90 percent chance that our make up in 2025 will be (Statistics NZ, 2015): • European or Other population (3.31 million in 2013) will be 3.43–3.62 million. • Maori population (0.69 million in…show more content…
We will need to be open-minded, patient and generous of spirit. Perhaps, the biggest benefit lies in the enrichment of our human spirit when we choose to open our minds and hearts to new ideas and different ways of doing things. Doubtlessly, during the next decade there will be an increased acceptance of intermarriages or sexual unions that cross ethnic boundaries, thus adding richness and complexity to our society. Such changes help us plan future needs including future education and health needs, and create a sense of vitality in our communities. Ethnic diversity enriches our personal interactions and experiences. New tastes and sights will ensure a more interesting environment. We will find an increasing number of multiethnic marketplaces and celebrations. These will become the norm in many parts of our country, which will further develop NZ as an innovative, peaceful country and a good global citizen. This should have positive consequences for NZ both locally and internationally. There will of course be ethnic diversity challenges including immigration, education, ethnic celebrations, the use of non-English languages and ethnic clothing to contend…show more content…
Decline of Christianity in NZ. The death of Christian NZ seems imminent. Church attendances have halved since 1960. For the first time, less than half of Kiwis call themselves Christians. In 1996, 64.2% of our population declared themselves to be Christian. The 2013 NZ Census has Christianity at some 44%, estimated to be 20% by 2035 with any revival looking very remote (Wallace, n.d.). There was also a significant rise in the “no religion” response from younger people. Of course we do not need to be religious to believe in God. It seems that the decline in Christianity is a major factor shaping our lives. We are becoming an increasingly pluralistic, materialistic, rational culture. We focus on scientific thinking and dismiss the supernatural as credible (Turner, 2013). It seems that Christianity is a dying cultural force in NZ. The number of Christians is diminishing, and those identifying as non-religious is rising steadily. People now more likely think about Easter eggs and the Easter bunny, Santa Claus and decorated Xmas trees than they do about
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