Emerson's Ideas Of Transcendentalism By Henry David Thoreau

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Henry David Thoreau born on July 27, 1817 was an American author, philosopher, poet, historian, naturalist, and leading transcendentalist. Thoreau is best known for his book, “Walden; or Life in the Woods” and also his essay “Resistance to Civil Disobedience.” He was born David Henry Thoreau, and later changed his name to Henry David after college. He was born to John Thoreau, who was a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. Thoreau’s maternal grandmother, Asa Dunbar, led 1766 student Butter Rebellion at Harvard, which was the first recorded student rebellion in the colonies. He studied at Harvard, like his grandmother, between 1833 and 1837. At Harvard he took courses in rhetoric, philosophy, science, mathematics, and classics. After graduating…show more content…
He was interested in nature’s relation to humans. Henry David Thoreau is best known for following in the footsteps of Emerson’s idea of transcendentalism. To get a better understanding of Thoreau’s ideas of transcendentalism, I will briefly talk about Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay entitled “Nature.” It is written to show importance to nature. In the introduction of Nature, Emerson reveals the purpose of his essay, which is that man takes nature for granted. Emerson says that humans do not experience nature and God directly. Emerson makes the point that the goal of science is to come up for a theory about nature. However, man will never understand the true form and spectacles of nature. Emerson makes another point saying nature and spirit are the only true mechanisms of the Earth. Emerson continues in his introduction to explain that nature is everything other than the human spirit. He speaks of nature and the spirit as if they were a form of “Yin and Yang.” In order for the spirit to exist, nature must exist. In the next eight chapters Emerson gives mediated high praise to nature. In the beginning of the first chapter Emerson expresses his belief that most adults lost the ability to approach nature as an awareness to separate us from our material world. As children, we see nature for the beauty it truly is. However, as we grow old nature becomes so accustomed to us that we forget the magnificence about it. Chapter 2, “Commodity” Emerson…show more content…
The core belief was that society, and its organized religion and political parties, contaminates the pureness of the individual. Transcendentalists believe people are at their best when they are truly independent, and self-reliant. In his book “Walden; or Life in The Woods” Thoreau stresses the idea of self-reliance and independence. The first few chapters in Thoreau 's, "Walden; or Life in The Woods" Thoreau’s experiment of living without the government and still maintaining a stable lifestyle is attainable. The first chapter in Thoreau 's, "Walden; or Life in The Woods" is entitled Economy. Thoreau starts off by introducing
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