Daisy's Love In The Great Gatsby

1031 Words5 Pages
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a fictional story of a man, Gatsby, whose idealism personified the American dream. Yet, Gatsby’s world transformed when he lost his god-like power and indifference towards the world to fall in love with Daisy. Gatsby’s poverty and Daisy’s beauty, class, and affluence contrasted their mutual affectionate feelings for one another. As Gatsby had not achieved the American dream of wealth and fame yet, he blended into the crowd and had to lie to his love to earn her affections. This divide was caused by the gap in their class structures. Daisy grew up accustomed to marrying for wealth, status, power, and increased affluence, while Gatsby developed under poverty and only knew love as an intense emotional…show more content…
Daisy’s original impression of Gatsby is evident in her early letters to him, “...he had deliberately given Daisy a sense of security; he let her believe that he was a person from much the same stratum as herself- that he was fully able to take care of her” (149). Daisy loved Gatsby under the false hope that they belonged to the same social class. She grew up surrounded by riches, never working a day in her life, and she could not comprehend the struggles of a man who must work for the food he eats each day. Daisy knew that she must marry when she is beautiful, for being a beautiful rich girl of good social standing was her highest commodity and most valuable chip in marrying well. In order to live a secure life, she had to find someone the had the means to provide for her extravagant lifestyle, and the deep care for her that would allow Daisy to do as she pleased. The only definition of love Daisy knew was one of disillusioned power and commitments under false pretenses in order to keep the wealthy continually rich. Daisy acknowledges the false pretenses of marriage for the wealthy in how she describes her daughter’s future. She tells Nick, “‘And I hope she’ll be a fool- that’s the best thing a girl can be in this…show more content…
He was as poor as could be and only gained any knowledge and hope of a different future from his parents due to a chance meeting with a rich and extravagant man. From him, Gatsby learned the ways of the wealthy and what it takes to be rich, however, he was never truly a member of the upper class. Just before Gatsby’s death, Nick comments that Gatsby is worth more than all of them put together, referring to the upper class. (154). However, Nick is only able to make this comment as Gatsby is not truly a part of the upper class that Daisy belongs to. Despite gaining the wealth, fame, and general appearance of the rich, at heart Gatsby is still the poor man that fell in love with Daisy five years prior. He lives in the past. Gatsby had no shot with Daisy as she needed someone who truly fit the constructs of the upper class, while Gatsby could never fulfill that requirement. Achieving Daisy would have been the epitome of the upper class. Lois Tyson writes in Critical Theory Today, “Possession of Daisy would give Gatsby what he really wants; a permanent sign that he belongs to her socioeconomic class, to the same bright, spotless, airy, carefree world of the very rich the Daisy embodies for him…” (71). If Gatsby had won Daisy’s love, it would have proved that he could assimilate with the wealthy. The failure of Gatsby to do so is a
Open Document