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Comparing Indentured Servants and Slaves

Slavery and indentured servitude were the primary means of help for the wealthy in America. Either as a slave or as an indentured servant a person was required to work in the fields maintain crops, as a house servant or as the owner of debtor so chooses. The treatment of both was very similar, but the method and means to which they came to America were uniquely different as the following examples will illustrate. Broteer was an African prince of the tribe of Dukandarra in Guinea. His father, Saungm Furro, was well off and king. When Broteer was six years old, his province was invaded by a large army of about 6000 men and very well equipped. The leaders of this army required Saungm to pay a large sum of money and livestock in order for his army not to invade. The king agreed in order to save his people from the hardships of conflict. However, he was informed by a friend or acquaintance that the army was not one of honor and did not keep their word. Therefore, Saungm set out to save his family and flee from the invaders. He set out in two groups in order to keep the traveling parties smaller and less noticeable. However, as they were camped and had lit a fire, a scouting party discovered their location from the smoke and captured the family. The king was killed for failing to divulge his riches, but Broteer and the women were treated more tolerantly since they were more submissive. After his capture, Broteer was made a waiter of a scouting party. He set out with them on hunts and soon discovered that these people were efficient and quick to lay waste to herds and to people. They often would sack villages and captured the inhabitants. The army continued to march and attack village after village. But as they did so, the size of the ... ... middle of paper ... ...sing the Atlantic in a Slave Ship in 1789” 2011. MyHistoryLab. Pearson Education, Inc. 1995-2011. 8 February, 2011. http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/hss_hine_aaodyssey_4/instructor_resources/primary_source_documents/chapter02/2_4.pdf Sprigs, Elizabeth. “Letter to Her Father” 2011. MyHistoryLab. Pearson Education, Inc. 1995-2011. 8 February, 2011. http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124639-content,00.html Bennett, Edward. “Wessell Webling, His Indenture (1622)” 2011. MyHistoryLab. Pearson Education, Inc. 1995-2011. 8 February, 2011. http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3125014-content,00.html Sewell, Samuel. “The Selling of Joseph” 2011. MyHistoryLab. Pearson Education, Inc. 1995-2011. 8 February, 2011. http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/hss_hine_aaodyssey_4/instructor_resources/primary_source_documents/chapter03/3_2.pdf
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