Candide Optimism

710 Words3 Pages
The author of Candide, Voltaire, or François-Marie Arouet was born 21 November, 1694 in the Enlightenment era. The Enlightenment was a cultural movement of intellectuals beginning in late 17th-century Europe emphasizing reason and individualism. Growing up in this world, Voltaire became a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of expression, and separation of church and state. His favorite way to attack was through satire, or the use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people 's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues. Candide…show more content…
This is seen through Pangloss, Candide’s teacher and a professor of metaphysico-theologico-cosmolo-nigology. Pangloss’s philosophy is said to be, “that there is no effect without a cause, and that, in this best of all possible worlds (4)”. He continues to say, “that things cannot be otherwise than as they are; for all being created for an end, all is necessarily for the best end (4).” Candide and Pangloss travel a happen upon Lisbon, which three-fourths was destroyed by an earthquake. Many people are blamed and punished, including Candide, who was whipped, and Pangloss, who was hanged. After this Candide exclaims, “"If this is the best of possible worlds, what then are the others? Well, if I had been only whipped I could put up with it, for I experienced that among the Bulgarians; but oh, my dear Pangloss! thou greatest of philosophers, that I should have seen you hanged, without knowing for what! (16)”. Candide is out right questions his teaching and therefore questioning optimism. Continuing his journey, Candide meeting Martin, who foils Pangloss. If Pangloss was an optimism, then Martin was a pessimist. Martin expects nothing but the worst from the world. The text explains, “Candide, however, had one great advantage over Martin, in that he always hoped to see Miss Cunegonde; whereas Martin had nothing at all to hope.” Voltaire’s goal with both characters, Pangloss and Martin, was to teach the public…show more content…
Candide meets a many members of the different religion and sees that they do not practice what they preach. One member he meets is a jewel stealing thief. The text reads, “Who was it that robbed me of my money and jewels?" said Cunegonde, all bathed in tears. ‘"How shall we live? What shall we do? Where find Inquisitors or Jews who will give me more?” “Alas!” said the old woman, "I have a shrewd suspicion of a reverend Grey Friar, who stayed last night in the same inn with us at Badajos. God preserve me from judging rashly, but he came into our room twice, and he set out upon his journey long before us. (23)"’ A friar takes a vow of poverty when he becomes a members of the Franciscan order. Later in Candide’s he meets a Jesuit colonel with marked homosexual tendencies. The Jesuit explains, “You know, my dear Candide, I was very pretty; but I grew much prettier, and the reverend Father Didrie, Superior of that House, conceived the tenderest friendship for me. (37)” He is openly and proudly sharing that he attracts the attention from older men. Candide also meets the Pope’s daughter, a man he should be celibate. The texts shares, “I am the daughter of Pope Urban X, and of the Princess of Palestrina. (25)” All of these people Candide meets show the flaws and corruption in religion and teaches people not to put these people on such high
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