Art Analysis Of Norman Rockwell's The Tattooist

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The Tattooist, is oil on canvas, made by Norman Rockwell. The size is 43 ⅛ x 33 ⅛ in -- it is located in a Brookline museum. Norman Rockwell’s paintings were said to have a very personal feel to them. It is said that his paintings feel so personal Rockwell was known to use his friends and neighbors as models. He also worked from photographs and went to great lengths to pose these photographs with his local community.To complete this, The Tattooist, Rockwell worked from photographs. In The Tattooist, Rockwell used one of his fellow illustrators, Mead Schaeffer as the tattooist and one of Rockwells’ neighbors, Clarence Decker, as the sailor. To prepare for such a photo, Rockwell borrowed a tattoo machine from the Bowery tattooist Al Neville. Rockwell also consulted with former sailors to insure accuracy in his painting of The Tattooist. Tattoos are a permanent reminder of our feelings at the time of our…show more content…
With twenty-three faded American traditional drawings. These drawings are made into crosses, flags, women, hearts, the American flag, and boats; the background is faded which makes the American traditional drawings transparent. The colors used to fill these drawings are basic colors like: Red, Yellow, Green, Blue, White, and so on and so forth. Every drawing is outlined with the color Black. He uses the background to show us some of the more popular tattoo designs of the day.
The Tattooist, made by Norman Rockwell. Has paintings personal feel, there are many themes of this painting but the one that sticks out the most is Tattoos are a permanent reminder of our feelings at the time of our adornment. Those feelings may change, but the tattoo is timeless. Tattoos are a permanent reminder of our feelings at the time of our adornment. Those feelings may change, but the tattoo is

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