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Ap Us History Dbq Analysis

analytical Essay
947 words
947 words
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In the fifteenth and sixteenth century, reasons for colonization of the newly discovered American land ranged from religious to economic, resulting in a number of unique imperial settlements along its eastern coast. After years of salutary neglect followed by strict enforcement of unpopular taxes, vehement settlers from each individual state united against Great Britain to form an independent government, as outlined and regulated by the United States Constitution. From the beginning of the nation’s history, interpretations of the constitution, influenced by bias stimulated by people’s situations, have divided the people of the United States. As sectional specialization developed and different ways of life based on region emerged, the constitution …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains the reasons for colonization of the newly discovered american land ranged from religious to economic, resulting in a number of unique imperial settlements along its eastern coast.
  • Analyzes how the dissimilar views of the "peculiar institution" of slavery between the north and south contributed significantly to the friction within the nation that led to unrest.
  • Compares how an anonymous georgian used the constitution's recognition of slavery to defend the law’s protection of property.
  • Analyzes how the georgian author of "plain words for the north" argued that it was the state’s right to practice slavery and ensure protection of property. jefferson davis viewed the constitution as an agreement between unique states.
  • Analyzes how different interpretations of the constitution had instigated disagreements within the union in the past, such as the rivalry between the federalists and democratic-republicans.

With Millard Fillmore’s signing of the Compromise of 1850, California entered the union as a free state and the rest of the Mexican Cession would be able to come in with popular sovereignty. Emphasizing the power of the people, popular sovereignty meant the territory would be open to slavery based on what the majority of citizens wanted. Depicting a clear divide between Slave and Free states based on region, a map of the status of slavery in the United States in 1850 exemplifies one of the core sectional differences that led to the Civil War (Doc 1). Amplified by Enlightenment ideals, the Second Great Awakening inspired many abolitionists to discuss the immorality of slavery and the Fugitive Slave Law, a part of the Compromise of 1850 that gave slave owners the right to recapture runaway slaves. Transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson held the belief in the citizens’ right and responsibility to disobey unjust laws set by a government, using a comparison of the cessation of the international slave trade to call for the end of the immoral Fugitive Slave Law. Emerson’s support for Civil Disobedience of the unjust laws involving slavery demonstrated the different feelings about slavery that split the country (Doc 3). In the North, where many runaway slaves now …show more content…

Representing the classic Southern position of the relationship between states in the union, the Georgian author of “Plain Words for the North” argued that it was the state’s right to practice slavery and ensure protection of property. Recognizing that states were independent before entering the Union, the author argues that the government and the constitution needed to protect the interests of all citizens. By addressing the disrupted balance between Slave and Free states in the Union, the author was concerned that the guarantees of the constitution, which should be protected by the federal government, would not be honored (Doc 2). A man who would go on to become the President of the Confederacy after its secession, Jefferson Davis viewed the constitution as an agreement between unique states, rather than cohesive one nation. With the Nullification Theory, the states had the right to invalidate a federal law that did not reflect their interests (Doc 6). Shortly after Abraham Lincoln’s election, secession began to actually occur in the South. Unlike the Southern view that the states could become independent of the nation, Lincoln stated that secession was not constitutional. As stated by the tenth amendment of the constitution, the federal government retained reserved powers, and

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