Detailed Study of Passage in Cry, the Beloved Country Essay example

Detailed Study of Passage in Cry, the Beloved Country Essay example

Length: 981 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Detailed Study #2
Cry, the Beloved Country

In this passage, the author details the reactions of parents who receive letters about and from their son who is soon to be executed.

This extract contains three sections, all of about the same length. The first paragraph in the excerpt contains only one character, Stephen Kumalo, who has opened one of four letters which he has received and grieves over the news that his son will be hanged. He does so without speaking to anyone else, and fearfully. There are others mentioned though, such as his son Absalom, Misimangu, and Mr. Carmichael, who are all senders of the letters, along with his wife, whom speaks to him at the end of the paragraph. Two characters are present in the second paragraph, Stephen and his wife. They grieve together over the news of their son’s execution, speaking sparsely and only when needed. Kuluse’s child, the girl Elizabeth, and “him”, which refers to their son, are the only mentioned characters. The third paragraph is not a conventional paragraph of either dialogue or narrative, but one of the letters sent to the parents, specifically, the letter from their son.

The text is written in two voices, 1st person direct speech by two to parents who speak to each other, and 3rd person narrative. This narrative, throughout the passage, relates the speakers’ actions, and is vital because it enunciates the action’s of the characters. Since the majority of the action takes place inside the hearts and minds of the characters, these actions and the narrative must be scrupulously looked at to fully understand the importance of the passage. An example of two words that when looked at again, contribute to the graveness of the passage are “four letters” in the sentence...


... middle of paper ...


...nd speaks well to me.” The diction in this letter is one of selflessness, regret, and love to his parents, which are shown in subtle phrases especially in those of the last sentence such as “My dear mother and father”, “So I shall not see you or Ndotsheni again”, and “…If I were back [in Ndotsheni] I should not leave it again.” The postscript, though, displays an urgency which was not displayed previously. The author uses hurried questions to display this urgency. “Is the child born?... Have you heard of the case…? …Did you get the money?” are examples of these questions asked, and this postscript is very similar to a will, in which he tries to tidy up that which he leaves behind.

The responses of a mother and father who have received news through four letters that their son is to be executed is narrated by the author in this excerpt from Cry, the Beloved Country.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Canadian Sovereignty over the Northwest Passage Essay

- A complex collection of more than 1800 separate islands forms the Canadian Archipelago and Canada’s Arctic territory. 1 Within recent history the arctic has gained popular attention from governments both domestically and internationally. The rise in global climate temperatures accounts for longer, ice free Arctic summers, higher levels of resource exploration and development, and less challenges to access in the Arctic. Canadian sovereignty over Arctic lands and islands is undisputed with the single exception of Hans Island, a 1.3 square kilometer island claimed by Denmark.2 Currently what is disputed is the Canadian assertion of sovereignty over the Northwest Passage waterway....   [tags: Canada, Northwest Passage]

Strong Essays
1943 words (5.6 pages)

Modernism in Forster's A Passage to India Essay

- Modernism in Forster's A Passage to India       When considering the novels of E.M. Forster, it is natural to recall the reserved landscapes of the Merchant and Ivory cinematic versions. Gauzy images - green hills, languorous boat rides, tender embraces - these impressions, cousins, really, to Jane Austen's plots and settings, are remembered as period pieces seldom associated with the literary experimentation of Virginia Woolf or the winsome angst of the lost War poets. It seems - does it not....   [tags: Forster Passage to India Essays]

Strong Essays
3463 words (9.9 pages)

Essay on A Passage to India by E.M. Forster

- A Passage to India by E.M. Forster Upon a most rudimentary evaluation, A Passage to India is simply a story, a tale of two countries through which we follow a handful of central characters. As readers, we watch as these characters travel from England to India, into mosques and temples and through caves....   [tags: Forster Passage India]

Strong Essays
1737 words (5 pages)

Free College Essays - Hindu Influence in A Passage to India

- A Passage to India - Hindu Influence Several different literary elements work in tandem to produce the magic seen in E. M. Forster's A Passage to India. Because this novel was presented to the world less than a decade after World War I, the fantastic and exotic stories of India seized the attention of the relatively provincial society of the day, and the novel's detailed presentation of Hinduism certainly excited the imaginations of thousands of readers. Benita Parry supports this assertion when saying, "Hinduism takes its place at the core of the novel just as it lies at the heart of India" (164)....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

Free Essays
522 words (1.5 pages)

Rite of Passage Essay

- "…He posited ‘things’ as possessing being…No wonder he later always discovered in things only that which he had put into them!" – Nietzsche The Rites of passage are classically viewed as the method by which age-superior members of the society transmit new and powerful knowledge to the young as part of the initiation into a new state of being. Some initiations involve a tangible progression, from one occupation or status group to another. Other initiations are passages of an intangible nature, involving the acquisition of metaphysical knowledge and abilities....   [tags: Rites-of-passage]

Strong Essays
3905 words (11.2 pages)

Public School Mentality in Howards End and Passage to India Essay

- Public School Mentality in Howard's End and Passage to India The public-school system remains unique because it was created by the Anglo-Saxon middle classes - how perfectly it expresses their character - with its boarding houses, its compulsory games, its system of prefects and fagging, its insistence on good form and on esprit de corps - (E.M. Forster, 'Notes on the English Character', 1936.) Forster perceived the public-school system to be at the centre of the English middle-classes, defining their set of core values and moulding their behaviour....   [tags: Education End Passage India Papers]

Strong Essays
1989 words (5.7 pages)

Essay on Analysis of A Passage to India by E. M. Forster

- Analysis of A Passage to India by Forster Forster's novel A Passage to India portrays a colonial India under British rule, before its liberation. For convenience's sake, Western civilization has created an Other as counterpart to itself, and a set of characteristics to go with it. An "us versus them" attitude is exemplified in Forster's representation of The Other. Separation of the British and the Indian exists along cultural lines, specifically religious/spiritual differences. Savage or ungodly cultures were to be assimilated into or at the least governed by Christians, and converted....   [tags: passage india forster essays papers]

Free Essays
1948 words (5.6 pages)

A Clash of Cultures in A Passage To India Essay

-       A Passage To India is a classic example of how different cultures, when forced to intermix, misunderstand each other, and what consequences stem from those misunderstandings. All of Forster's greatest works deal with the failure of humans being able to communicate satisfactorily, and their failure to eliminate prejudice to establish possible relationships. A Passage To India is no exception. (Riley, Moore 107) To understand Forster's motive, it must be established that he is a humanistic writer....   [tags: A Passage To India Essays]

Strong Essays
4248 words (12.1 pages)

Essay about Cultural Misunderstanding in A Passage to India

- Cultural Misunderstanding in A Passage to India One of the major themes of E. M. Forster's novel A Passage to India is cultural misunderstanding. Differing cultural ideas and expectations regarding hospitality, social proprieties, and the role of religion in daily life are responsible for misunderstandings between the English and the Muslim Indians, the English and the Hindu Indians, and between the Muslims and Hindus. Aziz tells Fielding at the end of the novel, "It is useless discussing Hindus with me....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

Strong Essays
815 words (2.3 pages)

Mysticism in A Passage to India Essay

- Mysticism in Forester's A Passage to India       The figure of Mrs. Moore, and the problem of what happened to her in the extraordinary Marabar Caves, has fascinated critics for decades. The question has absorbed attention to a degree that does not correspond to the secondary role that Mrs. Moore plays in the plot of A Passage to India. On the surface, she is a supporting character, yet many of the unresolved issues of the novel seem to be concentrated in her experience. Mrs. Moore arrives in India a sympathetic figure, and departs unresponsive and uncaring, transformed beyond recognition by the mysterious voice of the Marabar....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

Strong Essays
3924 words (11.2 pages)