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    William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom

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    William Faulkner is the author of Absalom, Absalom!, a Southern novel published in 1936. Faulkner dedicates his writing in Absalom, Absalom! to follow the story of ruthless Thomas Sutpen and his life as he struggles against the suspicion and doubt of the small-town folk that were born and raised in Jefferson, Mississippi. Himself a native-born Mississippian, Faulkner entered the world in September of 1897, and left it in July of 1962 at sixty-four years of age. He was the eldest of four brothers

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    William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" When asked by his Canadian roommate, Shreve, to "[t]ell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all", Quentin Compson chose to tell the story of Colonel Thomas Sutpen (142).The previous summer, Quentin had been summoned by Miss Rosa Coldfield, the sister of Sutpen's wife, to hear the story of how Sutpen destroyed her family and his own. In Miss Rosa's home, he sat "listening, having to listen

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    The Women of Absalom, Absalom!

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    The Women of Absalom, Absalom! The women of William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! embrace fundamental characteristics of the nature of the South and its relation to the women who inhabit the area. The women particularly challenge the reader to an examination of the time of the Civil War, the relation of the war to the South, and the relation of the people to their surroundings. There is a call for recognition of the intrinsic complexities of the South that stem from the mythological base of the

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    "Absalom, Absalom!" and "Gone With The Wind"

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    William Faulkner's classic Absalom, Absalom!, certainly ranks among the gems of twentieth century American literature and indeed is arguably the best Southern novel ever written. Indeed it might well be thought of as a metaphor of the Confederate legacy of the lost cause myth, which so desperately seeks an answer for how such a noble cause, championed by just and honorable men went down in utter collapse and defeat. For among the sorted affairs of the Sutpen clan lie the elements of destruction

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    William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!

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    William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" William Faulkner’s novel entitled Absalom, Absalom! is a book which systematically utilizes the concept of discovering the past in the present. Faulkner’s use of the past in the present is pertinent in both the construction of the plot of Absalom, Absalom! as well as the extension of its interpreted meanings. Furthermore, Faulkner’s writing of Absalom, Absalom! appears to have been motivated by the great ills and conflicts of the American South, which

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    The Themes of Faulkner's Absalom! Absalom! The theme of Absalom! Absalom! is the connectedness of humanity and the power of illusion vs. truth. In order to really translate these entities to the reader Faulkner uses the form of stream-of-consciousness. In this style of metaphorical writing one thing can lead you to all things, and vice versa. This is the form of the novel. One can compare this work to a gothic novel, to a Greek tragedy, to an entire metaphor for the situation of the South

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    The Narrative Technique of Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! Guilt should be viewed through the eyes of more than one person, southern or otherwise.  William Faulkner filters the story, Absalom, Absalom!, through several minds providing the reader with a dilution of its representation. Miss Rosa, frustrated, lonely, mad, is unable to answer her own questions concerning Sutpen's motivation.  Mr. Compson sees much of the evil and the illusion of romanticism of the evil that turned Southern

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    The Fantasy of Orality in Absalom, Absalom!

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    Four years after the publication of the first edition of Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Wallace Stevens described a modern aesthetic form which necessarily acted against its own status as a (fixed) form1. "What will [temporarily] suffice" in "Modern Poetry" would replace, as the mind's object, what is--or, perhaps more faithfully to the modernist vision, what used to be. The poem of the motion of the mind in time would replace the poem of permanent meaning. The fundamental difference between present

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    Faulkner's Condemnation of the South in Absalom, Absalom William Faulkner came from an old, proud, and distinguished Mississippi family, which included a governor, a colonel in the Confederate army, and notable business pioneers.  Through his experiences from growing up in the old South, Faulkner has been able to express the values of the South through his characters. William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom offers a strong condemnation of the mores and morals of the South.

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    What Might Have Been in Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! Emerging from and dwelling within an all-consuming lamentation, the characters of William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! enwrap themselves in a world of hurt wherein they cannot or will not release the past. Each comes to know the tragic ends of lingering among an ever-present past while the here and now fades under fretful shadows of days gone by. As the narrative progresses. the major players in this installment of Faulkner's fictional Yoknapatawpha

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    In Absalom, Absalom! the act of narration blurs the selfhood of the characters. Quentin and Shreve lose their senses of self while relaying the story of the Sutpens. They become the people they are relating the story of, most notably Bon and Henry. The act of narrating has a way of moving characters outside of selfhood and into a state of fluidity that allows the story-tellers to re-create the tale in a way that changes it from its original and gives it a newly invented life. The nature of telling

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    Role of the Black in the Southern Family as Evidenced in Clotelle and Absalom,  Absalom! Southern Literature, more than anything else, is a discussion of the family. And in the family, particularly the Southern family, no question is as pivotal--or causes as many disputes--as "who belongs?" Southern Literature has been, in many ways, a canon of exclusion. From a culture built upon controlling and utilizing an entire race for the express purpose of advancing another, a canon of yearning and despair

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    What is the meaning of the home? In most works of literature, the home is a symbol associated with comfort, family, and happiness. However, in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!, the home takes on a different meaning than in most literary works. In the novel, the home is actually used as a symbol for isolation and hostility. This is not only apparent in descriptions of Thomas Sutpen’s home, where most of the negativity in the novel is cultivated, but the motif of isolation is present in descriptions

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    How William Faulkner Constructs His Characters in Absalom, Absalom! Who says what - and how and when - may be the most compelling way William Faulkner constructs his characters in Absalom, Absalom! Storytelling is not just an act in which the saga of the Sutpens is recounted, revised, and even recreated; it is a gesture of self-disclosure. Each revelation about the past provides a glimpse into the present state of the narrating character's mind. The rhetoric, the digressions, the strange (and

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    Absalom, Absalom! Thomas Sutpen in the South Absalom Absalom!, written by William Faulkner was a novel that he wrote to represent this kind of figure that was defiant and self-governing. The importance of this novel was to specifically look at the man’s connection to the past. This story also represents many other things such as determination and slavery. Values as well played a big portion of the things that were different in the new South and from the perhaps Old South. In this story, Quentin

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    Absalom, Absalom!

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    -She is an old spinster (virgin) who has been described as “a ghost” in this novel because she is as all the other women who were living in the time of the civil war and lost their husbands. “Miss Coldfield in the eternal black which she had worn for forty-three years now, whether for sister, father, or nothusband none knew,”(2). She is the only female narrator among this narrative union. She narrates the story of the aggressive life of Thomas Sutpen as the only living link between the past and

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    William Faulkner's Use of Shakespeare

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    William Faulkner's Use of Shakespeare Throughout his career William Faulkner acknowledged the influence of many writers upon his work--Twain, Dreiser, Anderson, Keats, Dickens, Conrad, Balzac, Bergson, and Cervantes, to name only a few--but the one writer that he consistently mentioned as a constant and continuing influence was William Shakespeare. Though Faulkner’s claim as a fledgling writer in 1921 that “[he] could write a play like Hamlet if [he] wanted to” (FAB 330) may be dismissed as

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    Faulkner's Human Spirit

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    William Faulkner accepted his Nobel Peace Prize in December 1950. During his acceptance speech, Faulkner proclaimed that the award was made not to him as a man, but to his life’s work, which was created, “out of the materials of the human spirit something which did not exist before.” (PF ) He felt that the modern writer had lost connection to his spirit and that he must reconnect with the universal truths of the heart—“love and honor and pity and pride and compassion and sacrifice.” (PF ) Through

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    David. William Faulkner: His Life and Work. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press, 1980. 1-90. Print. Parini, Jay. One Matchless Time: A Life of William Faulkner. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2004. 39-47. Print. Shute, Sarah. "Absalom, Absalom!." Literature Online. Cambridge: Proquest Information and Learning Co, 2002. Literature Online. Web. 8 May 2012. . "The Hornets and Bees, The Oak and Reed." Jean de La Fontaine. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 May 2012. .

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    William Cuthbert Faulkner

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    William Cuthbert Faulkner “A preeminent figure in twentieth-century American literature, Faulkner created a profound and complex body of work in which he often explored exploitation and corruption in the American South.” William Faulkner’s writing most commonly set in Yoknapatawpha County, a fictional area based on his homeland of Mississippi. Explore the history of the South while making thorough observations of Human Character. The purpose of Faulkner’s writing style is to demonstrate a heart

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