Brave New World: Idea of the Future Essay

Brave New World: Idea of the Future Essay

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Imagine a life of luxury and happiness. Sounds like a dream . . . but what if it was reality. Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World explains how society turns into a dystopian future. He shows a world where humans are developed and controlled in means of stability. Aldous Huxley was raised in a family well-known for their intellectual and scientific achievements (Magill 952
-956). Therefore, he became a genius and even a prodigy for being brilliant and creative (Napierkowski and Stanley 32-34). He grew up to be a famous author, making science fiction and futuristic novels. After learning about Aldous Huxley and examining the influences around him, there are three prominent similarities between his life and the book. Hallucinogenic drugs, tragic world events, and new technology are just a few relationships included in Brave New World.
Traveling and learning about different religions played a major part in Huxley's life and novels (Napierkowski and Stanley 32-34). The most influential religions to his life were Hinduism and Buddhism. These two religions taught him the connection between the mind, body and soul. Inspired by these teachings, Huxley wanted to see if he could get a closer sense of self and be more introspective, so to enhance the world experience he took hallucinogenic drugs (Rollyson 468-470). Another type of drug called soma was used in the novel Brave New World as a mood-stabilizer. In Hindu sacrificial ceremonies, a similar hallucinogenic drink inspired the name “soma” (Hochman 65). This fact relates to ceremonies in the novel where soma is passed around a table while phrases are spoken about Ford in a scripture like manner.
Ford is a real person, but he is also a character in the book. Aldous Huxley wrote the nov...


... middle of paper ...


...s exciting world, but soon finds out that it is an abomination. Aldous Huxley took events, experiments, and life experiences to write a novel about human creation and a dystopia. Brave New World is a scientific idea of the future that many feel could or already came true.











Works Cited

"Aldous Huxley." Novels for Students. Ed. Marie Rose Napierkowski and Deborah A. Stanley. Vol 6. Detroit: Gale, 1999. 32-34. Print.
“Historical Content.” Novels for Students. Ed. Marie Rose Napierkowski and Deborah A. Stanley. Vol 6. Detroit: Gale, 1999. 62-64. Print.
Hochman, Jhan. “Critism.” Novels for Students. Ed. Marie Rose Napierkowski and Deborah A. Stanley. Vol 6. Detroit: Gale, 1999. 64-67. Print.
Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: Harper & Bros., 1946. Print.
Rollyson, Carl E. Notable British Novelists. Vol 2. Pasadena, CA: Salem, 2001. 468-470. Print.

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