Analysis Of The Poem ' Gilgamesh ' Essay

Analysis Of The Poem ' Gilgamesh ' Essay

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The repetition of this passage is significant as it establishes Gilgamesh’s claim to a figurative immortality visible in his role as king of Uruk, instead of the literal immortality he had been in pursuit of.

The passage does this by first describing the permanence and importance of Uruk and its wall in Tablet I. The epic praises both the technological advancements of the wall, “Survey its foundations, examine the brickwork! Were its bricks not fired in an oven?” (George 1), and the immensity of the city, “[thee square miles] and a half is Uruk’s expanse” (George 1). A few lines previously the narrator of the poem praises Gilgamesh as well, and tells of his many feats, including building the walls of Uruk. The way in which the narrator introduces Gilgamesh is of special importance as well. Instead of immediately naming who they were speaking of, the epic begins by “He who saw the deep” (Gilgamesh, 1). The absence of his name suggests that he is known for this very specific thing, and no one had replicated the feat, therefore his name required no clarification. The epic moves on and ...

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