Analysis Of ' The Awakening ' Essay

Analysis Of ' The Awakening ' Essay

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Edna Pontellier in the Awakening represents a woman who stands out from her comfort zone and awakes to realize she is not happy with what everybody else believed was correct or acceptable for society . In this journey of discovering her individualism and independency two important persons helped her to shape this new concept about life; Adele Ratignolle and mademoiselle Reisz. The close relationship that Edna formed with these two women is the key to her awakening. The nineteen century’s women considered friendship as a very important aspect of their lives. The Smith-Rosenberg describe in her article how important was the bond that women created between them and how intimated they were. We can say that Edna and her friends shared certain degree of intimacy between them; however it is not as deep as the relationship between women in the “Female World of Love and Ritual.” On the other side, Edna Pontellier was much rebel and independent that the women in the Smith-Rosenberg’s Article. Therefore, the relationship that she has with her friends was slightly different. Moreover, the relationship itself that she created with Adele was different to the relationship she had with Mademoiselle.
Edna Pontellier and Adele Ratognolle were close friends, but they were very different. Adele is all what Edna doesn’t want to be. Adele is portraying as a women who is devoted to her husband and children. She is the perfect mother-women that the creole society expected to be. She represents the role model of nineteen century. As the following quote stated Adele Retignolle was very proud of her life and children “Mrs. Retignolle was always talk about her condition” (Shopin). The condition that this quote is referring is the pregnancy of ...


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... life was not any of her friends, in fact was her lover Robert. Edna saw in Robert that person with who she can spend hours talking and building a deep connection. This does not mean she did not bound with her friends. In fact she did, but only in certain degree. In the article “love and Ritual” women did not have any connection with their husbands or men as we can see in these quote “Boys were obviously indispensable the elaborated courtship ritual girl engaged in. In these teenagers’ letters and diaries, however, boys appear distant and warded off (Smith-Rosenberg).”
Edna was a modern women leaving in the nineteen century who wanted be free from the oppression of society. Her friends were crucial for her awakening because each of them in their own way help her to shape her new personality through the story. Each of then represent an important part of it.

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