Women's Suffrage Movement Essay example

Women's Suffrage Movement Essay example

Length: 570 words (1.6 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The ability to vote in the United States changed dramatically in the early years of the country, changing from only white males who were property owners to almost all white males around 1850. Between 1807 and 1890, women were not allowed to vote, although by 1870 all men including former slaves were allowed to vote. The Women’s Suffrage Movement can be traced back to the “Declaration of Sentiments”, from a women’s rights convention that was held in Seneca Falls, N.Y. in 1848. Suffragists challenged the views of traditional roles of women, believing that all women should have a voice in political affairs, and the right to back up their voices with a vote.
The 1830’s played an important role in initiating important changes in America, such as societies for moral-reform, religious movements, and anti-slavery sentiment. Women were beginning to take leadership roles in many of these groups and movements, and the traditional role of women in society was questioned by those who found their roles more than just common housewife or mother (A&E, 2011). Among the women who questioned traditional roles for females in society were Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott.
Stanton and Mott were reformists that believed that the Declaration of Independence should have read “that all men and women were created equal” and that all women should have the right to vote just as men did. In 1840, Stanton and Mott attended an anti-slavery convention, but they were refused the right to speak or even be seated. This event would lead Stanton and Mott to conclude that if they were to help free the slaves that they would first need to secure basic rights for women. Although eight years would pass, Stanton and Mott would hold the histo...


... middle of paper ...


...
History.com (2011). The fight for women’s suffrage. Retrieved on October 19, 2011 from http://www.history.com/topics/the-fight-for-womens-suffrage
Law Library- American Law and Legal Information (2011). Seneca Falls convention. Retrieved on October 19, 2011 from http://law.jrank.org/pages/10144/Seneca-Falls-Convention.html
Library of Congress (1998). Votes for women: National American women’s suffrage association collection, 1848-1921. Retrieved on October 18, 2011 from http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/naw/
Linder, D. (2011). Women’s fight for the vote: The nineteenth amendment. Retrieved on October 19, 2011 from http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/nineteentham.htm
Susan B. Anthony House (2009). Biography of Susan B. Anthony. Retrieved on October 19, 2011 from http://susanbanthonyhouse.org/her-story/biography.php

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Suffrage Movement Analysis Essay examples

- The suffrage movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, began with the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 during which early suffrage leaders including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony proposed the Declaration of Sentiments, a document stating the rights that women demanded (4).Women argued that they deserved to vote as it was a basic right that everyone should be guaranteed as an American citizen (5). Considering that women must obey the same laws and pay the very same taxes as men, it was necessary that they receive a voice in these laws (5)....   [tags: suffrage movement, women rights, equality]

Better Essays
566 words (1.6 pages)

Women's Suffrage Movement Essay example

- The ability to vote in the United States changed dramatically in the early years of the country, changing from only white males who were property owners to almost all white males around 1850. Between 1807 and 1890, women were not allowed to vote, although by 1870 all men including former slaves were allowed to vote. The Women’s Suffrage Movement can be traced back to the “Declaration of Sentiments”, from a women’s rights convention that was held in Seneca Falls, N.Y. in 1848. Suffragists challenged the views of traditional roles of women, believing that all women should have a voice in political affairs, and the right to back up their voices with a vote....   [tags: change, traditional roles, women]

Better Essays
570 words (1.6 pages)

The History of the Women’s Suffrage Movement Essays

- Women’s suffrage, or the crusade to achieve the equal right for women to vote and run for political office, was a difficult fight that took activists in the United States almost 100 years to win. On August 26, 1920 the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States was ratified, declaring all women be empowered with the same rights and responsibilities of citizenship as men, and on Election Day, 1920 millions of women exercised their right to vote for the very first time. The women’s suffrage movement is thought to have begun with the publication of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft in 1792....   [tags: Women's Rights ]

Better Essays
976 words (2.8 pages)

Essay on Women’s Suffrage Movement in America

- As I walked into the Crowne Plaza on the Ventura promenade on November 2, 2010, I was preparing to vote. I walked into the polling room, gave my name and identification, and was handed a voting sheet just as I had every other time I went to vote. I think this was the first time that I really contemplated about how lucky I was to live in a time where my voice has meaning. So many of my friends ask me “why do you vote, it doesn’t matter” and to me it is this kind of attitude that we need to as a society reflect on and regroup our thoughts on this issue....   [tags: Women's Rights ]

Better Essays
2476 words (7.1 pages)

The Women's Suffrage Movement Essay

- Women suffrage movement was and continues to be one of the most incredible events to occur in history of United States. It was a struggle by women’s to achieve their rights to vote and to stand for electoral office. Women in United States did not have the right to vote until as early as 19th century. Besides the struggle of many individuals female suffrage was very difficult to achieve. It was not until August, 1920 women were not conferred with voting rights at national level. These rights of women effected the elections of federal government and became an important factor in deciding the national leaders....   [tags: turning points in American history]

Better Essays
529 words (1.5 pages)

The Women's Suffrage Movement Essay

- ... Women were, generally, huge supporters of the adoption of Prohibition. Protestants were a driving force behind the Progressive Party and the Progressive era, they are an example of a religion in support of women’s suffrage. Catholics were, as a whole, opposed to women’s suffrage. They believed that, “a woman’s place was in the home” not in the voting booths (Bary). Although all of the previously stated groups opposed women’s suffrage, the largest block of opposition was San Francisco County....   [tags: right to vote, legislature]

Better Essays
1957 words (5.6 pages)

The Women’s Suffrage Movement Essay

- Starting in 1776 with a letter from Abigail Adams to her husband, the movement for Women’s suffrage lasted a superfluous amount of time. Mrs. Adam’s request for the President to “remember the ladies” set in motion a whole movement that would revolutionize the United States of America. A movement that set forth rights that the women of today take for granted. The women’s suffrage movement began in the mid-nineteenth century. Women began discussing the problems they faced in society and the different ways they wanted to change their lives....   [tags: Gender Issues]

Better Essays
1368 words (3.9 pages)

Susan B. Anthony and The Women Suffrage Movement Essay

- Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) is considered one of the most influential figure in the women’s suffragist of her generation and has become an icon of the woman’s suffrage movement. Anthony is known to travel the country to give speeches, circulate petitions, and organize local women’s rights organization. Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts. After the Anthony family moved to Rochester, New York in 1845, they became active in the antislavery movement gaining more supporters across the country....   [tags: women's right, equality, anti slavery]

Better Essays
919 words (2.6 pages)

Women Strive for Education and Equal Rights Essay

- The Quran states: "That man can have nothing but what he strives for" (QS. 53:39). The word ‘man’ used in this verse not only covers the patriarchal nature, but the androgynous nature of humans as a whole. Women were once considered property of men; even if not as property then only as pinch-hit for male labour. The highest rank given to a woman was of one who bore male labours and fed them. No voting rights, no right to run for office, or the right to own property of their own. Male members of the society were allowed to marry as many women as they yearned for while women had to adhere to monogamy just to stop the property from being transferred to someone else’s’ children....   [tags: feminism, suffrage movement, women's rights]

Better Essays
1164 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on A Historical Overview of Women's Suffrage Movement in US and Arizona

- A Historical Overview of Women's Suffrage Movement in US and Arizona 1. An Overview Of Women's Suffrage Movement In The United States The women’s suffrage movement achieved victory with the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920. For the first time in more than 110 years, women were given the right to vote. However, nine states at this time already guaranteed the women’s vote. At this time, all nine states lay west of the Mississippi, (Rothschild, p.8)....   [tags: Essays Papers]

Better Essays
2286 words (6.5 pages)