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    Zen

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    Zen Suzuki was obsessed with proving Buddhism as a unified tradition to be scientific and in accordance with modern, universal culture. He calls it "rational" and "positivistic" (1959a, x) and "radical empericism" (1974, 2). "Buddhism is reality, reality is Buddhism" (1970D, 7), it is an "ultimate fact of all philosophy and religion" (1956, 111). Like his Victorian predecessors, he rejected all ritualistic activity as merely symbolic (or as a spiritual gestus towards the unenlightened folk

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    zen

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    class that we had the choice to take a trip to the Zen Center I was very intrigued; but when I was told that we could chose this instead of reading a book for a report, my teenage mindset told me to go to the Zen Center instead of reading. When we pulled up into the driveway I saw a gorgeous 19th century looking house. I thought to myself for a second, how can this be a Buddhist temple, but when I looked at the sign (and was informed) that it was a Zen Center for Western Buddhists. When we fist arrived

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    Zen Buddhism

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    Zen Buddhism was first introduced to China by a South- Indian man called Bodhidharma in around 520 CE. Bodhidharma, according to tradition, was a man so epic that he removed his own eyelids in order to win a staring contest with a rock wall (from his severed eyelids sprang tealeaves, and thus, the connection between Zen Buddhism and tea-drinking). The main teaching of Zen is that of zazen, or seated meditation, and that only through meditation and action, rather than cogitation, can one achieve

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    Zen Buddhism

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    Zen Buddhism No other figure in history has played a bigger part in opening the West to Buddhism than the eminent Zen author, D.T. Suzuki. One of the world's leading authorities on Zen Buddhism, Suzuki authored more than a hundred popular and scholarly works on the subject. A brilliant and intuitive scholar, Dr. Suzuki communicated his insights in a lucid and energetic fashion. Diasetz Teitaro Suzuki was born in Japan in 1870, received his philosophical training as a Buddhist disciple at

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    Zen Buddhism

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    Ch’an and Zen Buddhism Throughout the early years in many East Asian countries, there were many people who were looking for answers to this world’s, and otherworldly, questions. When Gotama became enlightened, and began preaching the practices of Buddhism, it came at such a time when the Han dynasty was collapsing, citizens were tired of Confucianism and looking for a new ideology that they could put there hearts and souls into. Over the years, Buddhism proved to be much more than just a religion;

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    Zen Buddhism Baseball

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    speaker Bhante Sujatha, Zen Buddhism is simply defined as meditation. With that said, the Zen reach Buddha through daily meditation. When comparing Zen Buddhism to Japanese athletics these two categories possess many of the same characteristics. The Zen spirit has a direct correlation to the sport of baseball. Baseball is a game of inches, in order for you to succeed and do well in the sport you must do all the little things efficiently day in and day out. This is quite the case in Zen Buddhist as they

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    Zen in the Art of Archery, by Eugen Herrigel describes the ritualistic arts of discipline and focus that the Zen religion focuses around. In this book, Herrigel describes many aspects of how archery is, in fact, not a sport, but an art form, and is very spiritual to those in the east. The process he describes shows how he overcame his initial inhibitions and began to look toward new ways of seeing and understanding. In the beginning of the book Herrigel tells us that he is writing about a ritual

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    Enso Circle and Zen

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    The Enso, or Zen circle, is what I have chosen as the focus of this paper. In my Google search for the “perfect” example of the Enso circle I realized this symbol has been reproduced hundreds, if not thousands of times. At first I was asking myself how could I identify with such a “stock” symbol that has been reproduced so many times? Had I really become sort of low in my expectations of what I had hoped to get from this class? But while I was berating myself in the typical Roman Catholic fashion

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    Zen Buddhisim and Japan

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    Zen Buddhism and Japan Japan and the development of Zen Buddhism went hand in hand towards the beginning of the sixth century. Buddhism was in full bloom in India and the Chinese were adapting it to there Lifestyle when several Japanese clans began picking it up. Zen Buddhism Zen Buddhism is a combination of Indian and Chinese thought process revolving around the world as it is and the discipline of finding enlightenment. The idea of enlightenment or Satori as the Japanese called it was the central

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    Zen In Art And Art

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    exposure or any type of familiarity with the Zen tradition. The uniquely Japanese branch of Buddhism has indeed flourished, and focuses on eliminating the sources of human suffering, or in other words, dukkha. On its simplest level, the effect on the development of this Japanese-Buddhist culture continues to resonate among its followers, as it did approximately 2500 years ago. However, there is a question that remains to an even larger extent. How actually did Zen come to influence not only the worlds of

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    Zen and the Enlightened Mind

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    Zen and the Enlightened Mind "I have forgotten everything. I don't remember a single word"(Masunaga 36). This is the mind of one who seeks the Way. In A Primer of Soto[JS1] Zen Dogen explains the Way of the Buddha and stresses the importance of "sitting in meditation" or zazen as a means of reaching the manifestation of wholeness. The manifestation of wholeness is a state in which one abandons both mind and body and empties oneself of ignorance, delusions, and dualistic modes of thinking. One

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    philosophies and religion. One philosophical religion in particular that heavily influenced Samurai culture was Zen Buddhism. It played a major role in their lives. It shaped the samurai’s way of life, mentally and psychologically, which in return aided them in their combat and martial arts. Zen Buddhism is a form of practice in spiritual awakening between a master and his student. “Zen is Zazen or Zen meditation, za meaning sitting, or seated meditation” (2). Just as stated, to perform the meditation properly

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    the nature of perceived ultimacy in Zen Buddhism. This will be achieved through providing a justification for why this question should be of any interest and then hypothesizing about possible implications of the results. Next, the framework that is to be used in categorizing the core beliefs in Zen will be explained and made clear. After this description is complete the author will proceed to fit Zen Buddhism into this framework and will demonstrate that the Zen religion is no exception to the employed

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    no longer equivalent to that of the arhant, rather, he is beyond the level of the arhant; he is a transcended being. Within Mahayana, Madhyamika and Yogacara philosophical schools developed in India and the Zen tradition arose once Buddhism spread to East Asia. While Madhyamika, Yogacara, and Zen emphasize several different concepts in an effort to attain enlightenment, all three adhere to the Mahayana doctrine of emptiness and non-duality. At the core of the Mahayana doctrine of emptiness lays in

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    ethical teachings that can be found within Zen Buddhism. Soyen Shaku was a Zen master and Buddhist monk from Japan. He wrote the book “Zen for Americans” from which we will review the teachings he discussed regarding spiritual enlightenment. The mixture of Buddhism and Taoism is what composes Zen Buddhism. Zen in its essence, involves a process of self-discovery. Meditation is a vital process of self-discovery and is also an essential process of both Zen Buddhist and Buddhist alike. Which is what

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    Throughout Buddhist scripture there is a great amount of articulation against violence. The Buddha actively speaks against violence, but at the same time Buddhism promotes the spread of the dharma. Within Zen at War Victoria highlights the Buddha’s words, “until all sentient beings are united together through the exercise of infinite compassion, there will never be peace” (29). This quote became incorporated into the Japanese military and the inevitable nature of war was molded into this normally

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    Zen Buddhism and Bart Simpson?

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    Zen Buddhism and Bart Simpson? Professor’s comment: The following essay is only one of a series of mind-bending ones that Rob wrote for my class, essays that demonstrated not just a quirky sense of humor but also a razor-sharp intellect and distinctive voice. This particular essay was written in response to an assignment asking students to explain a concept. From the first line of this essay, I knew I was on to something special: how many people would choose to explain an element of Zen Buddhism

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    Zen or Japanese Buddhism is one of the quintessential eastern spiritually intertwined religions that changed the perspective on reality and ultimately life. One of the main historical thinkers responsible for the manifestation of Zen is Dogen Zenju. He established the importance of meditation, as the principle vehicle for mindfulness. Furthermore, Dogen established that, “the Buddhist practice is simply the meditational practice of realizing enlightenment”, or also referred to as zazen (Koller, 278)

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    Zen Philosophy in Japanese Death Poems: Dealing With Death Each and every culture follows a certain set of distinct practices that are distinct and specific to each individual culture. The common Western perception of Japan's ambiguous practices stems from the extreme difference in views correlated with the widespread lack of knowledge concerning the ancient culture steeped in tradition. Japan's widely Buddhist population is known for their calm acceptance of death as a part of life. One

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    Following in the Ways of Zen Buddhism

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    Following in the Ways of Zen Buddhism I fell in love with the first Buddhist I ever met. That is to say I fell in love with a man who is a Buddhist. I, however, am not a Buddhist. I have faith in what I find to be right rather than committing to a religion that I would not wholeheartedly believe in. It would seem that a difference in our spiritual practices may be a strain on our relationship, but in truth our faith lies in similar areas. The biggest difference between us is that I lack the

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