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    country's status among the powerful countries of the world. But the use of these natural resources and the economic strength of the country would not be possible without the work of two Nigerian leaders; Austine Okocha and Wole Soyinka, who is Nigeria's most widely read author. Wole Soyinka chronicles Nigerians' lives and captures the true essence of the people with his patriotic words. Austine Okocha, better known as Jay Jay, is celebrated as Nigeria's greatest footballer. These two men have helped Nigeria

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    Homo sapiens that should be treated with respect from the day we are born to the day we die. From the moment you start reading "Every Dictator's Nightmare," you are drawn by the powerful, captivating words of Wole Soyinka. He truly speaks words of wisdom and truth in vivid detail on the subject of human beings and their rights. His article is based on his belief that, "certain fundamental rights are inherent to all humanity."

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    Both "Sizwe Bansi is Dead", (written by Athol Fugard in collaboration with John Kani and Winston Ntshona) and "Death and the King's Horseman" (written by Wole Soyinka) are both set in South Africa, in two important and significant cultural moment for the country. "Swize Bansi is Dead" tells the difficult reality of Africa under apartheid (1950s), analysing the complex issue of identity in that time. The rules of Apartheid meant that people were legally classified into a racial group, mainly Black

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    How do the poems ‘Telephone Conversation’ by Wole Soyinka, ‘War Photographer’ by Carol Ann Duffy and ‘A Mother in a Refugee Camp’ by Chinua Achebe explore the theme of conflict? Conflict is a topic that is often associated with negative connotations. It evokes emotions such as sadness or fear and can make the reader empathetically experience pain or loss. Examples of conflict include war and racism. The poems ‘Telephone Conversation’ by Wole Soyinka, ‘War Photographer’ by Carol Ann Duffy and ‘A Mother

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    The drama of Wole Soyinka is the creative mixing of Yoruba rituals, dramatic techniques, music and dance with the foreign language, English. The rites, rituals, gestures, music and dance are some of the nonverbal techniques Soyinka employs in order to achieve his dramatic effect. The language is full of wit and graphic insult. Language is not the only thing Soyinka relies on for effective theatre but also on so many techniques. This is an attempt to discuss these techniques in some important plays

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    Ritualistic Sacrifice in The Strong Breed

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    Wole Soyinka, like other Nigerian writers, characterizes the conflict of cultural and religious choices in his country and emphasizes the distinct customs of society (Tucker 9). Born into the Yoruba tribe and culture, Soyinka’s writings are clearly influenced by Yoruba culture and practices. Communities and societies in Africa today religiously partake in ancient rituals that some may consider extreme, such as cannibalism and self-mutilation. In the village in The Strong Breed, the extent to which

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    of the play, it seems rather evident for which side Soyinka himself is more of a prominent advocate, obvious by the way he portrays both Lakunle and Baroka, and how they conclude their roles in the play. Lakunle’s follies in the play become his undoing, whereas Baroka’s strength and titular power as the Bale of the village wins Sidi’s hand in marriage, ultimately proving tradition to be the ultimate survivor in this battle royale. However, Soyinka seems to blur the lines a bit more by including the

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    techniques used within the two works will be observed. My rein is loosened. I am master of my Fate. When the hour comes, Watch me dance along the narrowing path, Glazed by the soles of my great precursors. My soul is eager. I shall not turn aside. (Soyinka, 2002:10). The play is set in the ancient Yoruban city of Oyo in Nigeria, nineteen forty three. The King has died and on the night in question his Horseman must escort him to the afterlife. The Kings Horseman, Elesin Oba, dancing through the marketplace

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    Colonialism versus Origin Within Wole Soyinka’s and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s intricately weaved novels, both pieces of literature successfully intertwine to portray the estrangement and hardships dealt with through the main characters in settling within a separate environment apart from their origins; culture and adopting the colonial mentality which is imposed upon them. There is a negative portrayal of the colonial mentality that manifests onto the African society. There are three major categories

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    In the play Death and the King’s Horseman by Wole Soyinka, the author uses the representation of woman as the defenders of the Yoruba tradition. Soyinka tells us in this “Author’s note” that the play is based on an incident in Nigeria in 1949. In Yoruba tradition, it is the sacrifice of the king’s horseman that plays the essential role in bringing good fortune onto the community. While these leaders of the Yoruba culture are predominantly male, the role of the Yoruba woman as both defender and keeper

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