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    Victim in Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles

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    Presented." Texas Studies in Literature and Language 28 (1986): 324-38. Hall, Donald. Afterward. Tess of the d'Urbervilles. By Thomas Hardy. New York: Signet, 1980. 417-27. Hardy, Thomas. Tess of the d'Urbervilles. 1891. New York: Signet Classic, 1980. McMurtry, Jo. Victorian Life and Victorian Fiction. Hamden: Shoe String, 1979. Mickelson, Anne Z. Thomas Hardy's Women and Men: The Defeat of Nature. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1976. Weissman, Judith. Half Savage and Hardy and Free. Middletown:

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    Theme of Diversity in Crying of Lot 49, Good-bye, Columbus, and Survivor Diversity is an attribute that is seen among people, situations and cultures.  Everyone has encountered different situations at one time or more during their lives that has either been pleasant or upsetting.  Certain novels written in the 1950's to the present show signs of multiformity very clearly. In regards to culture, people are placed in unusual situations where their diversity is shown. Throughout the

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    My Utopian Society

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    The Utopian land is divided into two main terrains: farmland and cities. The farmlands, of course, are where most of the country's resources are produced. The services of the economy, smithing, carpentry, clothmaking, etc., are mainly produced in the cities. Iron is the only resource which must be imported abundantly. All of the resources, except iron, that the nation requires, it produces on its own. The Utopians live a very simple lifestyle. They work, and in their spare time play games, read

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    Symbols and Symbolism in Death in Venice

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    indeed is the case, then Aschenbach is not only a token of the frailty of Mann, but an emblem of the fallacies plaguing us all. Works Cited and Consulted: Albert, George. Symbolism in Death in Venice. Notre Dame Press, Indiana. 1995 Mann, Thomas. Death in Venice and Other Stories. New York: Random House, Inc., 1989. Wagner, Rich. The Autobiographical Tragedy. New York: Vintage Books, 1992.

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    The Identity of Thomas Pynchon The identity of Thomas Pynchon is as elusive as the sticky, complex webs of meaning woven into his prose. As America's most "famous" hidden author, Pynchon produces works which simultaneously deal with issues of disappearance and meaning, of identity and nothingness in a fashion that befuddles some and delights others. He speaks to the world from his invisible pulpit, hiding behind a curtain of anonymity that safely disguises his personality from the prying

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    Potter is seen in Yellow Sky as a person that one dreams of being, a wild-west hero that one idolizes. Soon, Crane reduces Jack Potter to the same level of the reader, and maybe below because he is now seen as a fallen hero. Works Cited Beer, Thomas. Stephen Crane: A Study in American Letters. 1923. Reprint. New York; Octagon Books, 1972, pg.248. Modern Fiction Studies, Stephen Crane Number V, No.3 (Autumn: 1959): 195-291. Solomon, Eric. Stephen Crane in England: A Portrait of the Artist

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    The Crucible - Hypocrisy Charles was a greedy man. He was cold hearted and never philanthropic. This "Scrooge" was the CEO of a multi-million dollar stock company in New York City. Charles often told his employees that honesty is the key to success and that he would not tolerate liars. When approached by a potential client himself, he told the client that he would be sure to consult with him before making any major decisions. As soon he left the room, however, he transferred all of the man's

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    Dionysian one shows that art reflects life. In his case, art is nothing more than a reflection, and although beautiful and appreciated, it is not an essential element of life itself. Works Cited "Mann, Thomas." Microsoft(r) Encarta(r) 98 Encyclopedia. 1993-1997. Mann, Thomas. Death In Venice. New York: Vintage Books, 1989. http://philos.wright.edu/Dept/CLS/wk/204/DV.html

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    Visconti's Interpretation Mann's of Death in Venice Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice" is a very complex novella. To put it on screen, a director has to pick the most important (or easiest to portray) elements from the mythological, psychological and philosophical lines of the story. The plot would remain largely intact. I am most interested in the story of Aschenbach's homosexuality, so I would be concerned with the strange-looking men, Aschenbach's dreams, and the parallel between the denial

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    Life and Death in Frost's Stopping by Woods and Thomas' Do Not Go Gentle Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" and Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" reflect deeply on both life and death. Frost interprets death as rest and peace from a hard and deserving life, whereas Thomas depicts death as an early end to an unfulfilled life. Contrary to Thomas's four characters who rage against death because of its premature arrival, Frost's speaker accepts death but is

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    In the turn of the century, the time of Bigger Thomas, the roles of black men and women in America were heavily restricted compared to the white population. Black people were also still treated unequally and dealt with as ignorant fools. Richard Wright's novel, Native Son, embraces this knowledge and follows the reaction of one angry man as he manages the delights of his exploits and the consequences of his deeds. Challenging pressures and stereotypes, Bigger believes he understands the world

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    events) and, unless a historical genius, probably feels confused as to the historical accuracy of such references. As critics have shown, Pynchon blends factual history with fiction and manages, as David Seed writes in "The Fictional Labyrinths of Thomas Pynchon," to "juxtapose(s) historical references with reminders of the novel's status as artefact so that the reader's sense of history and of fiction are brought into maximum confrontation" (128). Pynchon, for example, in "Lot 49" speaks at length

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    Shakespeare's Sonnets

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    Shakespeare's Sonnets Shakespeare's sonnets, as poems, have been obscured by the enormous amount of speculation, much of it unjustified, that has grown up around the problems presented by the dedication.  The following sonnet is commonly grouped with 125 others that are believed to have been written to a much admired young man, who was Shakespeare's junior in both years and social status. The form in which the poem is written is often referred to as Shakespearean or English form.  As in

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    A Bronx Tale Cologero

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    A Bronx Tale                Cologero "A Bronx Tale" is a film directed by Robert Di Nero about a boy named Cologero (an Italian white male) and his life as he grows up in a town occupied by the mob. Colegero had two strong adult influences in his life.  They were his father, Lorenzo, and a mob leader named Sonny.  In the film there were a three scenes that especially demonstrated the influence Sonny and Lorenzo had on Cologero. An example of Lorenzo's influence on his son takes place in front

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    Image of Women in Canterbury Tales, Burgermeister's Daughter and the Writings of Thomas Aquinas What was the predominant image of women and women's place in medieval society? A rather sexist or misogynistic view--by twentieth century standards of course--was prevalent among learned clerics. The writings of the theologian Thomas Aquinas typify this view. But although the religious of Europe's abbeys and universities dominate the written record of the period, Thomistic sexism was not the only

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    were written during times of trouble in their respective poet's life. Thomas was faced with losing his father to death; Milton was dealing with becoming completely blind at the age of forty-three. As each poet struggles to deal with the crisis occurring in his life, he makes a statement about the relationship between mankind and God, the reasons that God gives and then takes away certain gifts, and the proper way to live life. Thomas and Milton ended up with contrasting answers to these fundamental questions

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    Parallel Journeys in The Crying of Lot 49 The Crying of Lot 49 offers two journeys into the text: that of it's protagonist Oedipa, and that which the reader is forced to take with her. His brilliant use of detail and word plays blur the lines between the two. The main factor in this journey is chaos, here referred to by its’ more scientific name entropy. Oedipa and the reader get lost in a system of chaos and the task of deciphering the clues within the intricate system. The reader has no choice

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    Jude the Obscure and Social Darwinism

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    End Notes: (1) Hardy, Thomas, Jude the Obscure, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1985, p. 41 (I.-vii). (2) Ibid., p. 426 (VI.-xi). (3) Ibid., p. 430 (VI.-xi). (4) Ibid., p. 65 (I.-x). (5) Abrams, M. H., ed., The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 6th ed., Vol. 2., Norton, New York, 1993, p. 1692. Bibliography: Abrams, M. H., ed., The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 6th ed., Vol. 2., Norton, New York, 1993. Hardy, Thomas, Jude the Obscure, Oxford University

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    moral reputation.  Thomas Cromwell and Richard Rich do not compare to More’s moral stature because both Rich and Cromwell lie, while Rich accepts bribes and Cromwell does anything King Henry VIII tells him to no matter what it is, and they will do whatever it takes to get what they want.  More on the other hand, would not lie no matter what the consequences would be, he would not accept a bribe under any circumstance and he would never go against his morals. Sir Thomas More is a good moral

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    Thomas Hobbes' Answer to Davenant's Preface to Gondibert In his "Answer to Davenant's Preface to Gondibert," Thomas Hobbes takes a stab at literary theory. He is prompted to write the reply because Davenant mentions Hobbes in the preface to the epic poem, Gondibert. Hobbes notes up front that he is hindered in two ways because he is 1) incompetent in poetry and 2) flattered by the praise Davenant has lauded him. These hindrances don't prevent Hobbes from detailing a general theory of poetry

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