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    The Tet Offensive

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    Vietnamese had an unstable relationship. He hoped that through the Tet Offensive the US would believe they were no longer worth defending. Fighting was done using guerrilla warfare which blurred the lines of legitimate and illegitimate killings and this had effect of bringing peoples morales down. Support for the war had always been split but this battle caused even the government to reconsider their involvement. The Tet offensive changed the US's attitude towards the Vietnam war by leading to further

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    The Tet offensive was a coordinated attack on several cities and American bases in South Vietnam by a force of over 80,000 PAVN soldiers or “People’s army of Vietnam” they were also called Viet Cong or more commonly “Charlie”. Prior to the Tet Offensive on 30 January 1968 Hue was almost untouched by the war. Hue was the capital of Thua Thien province which bordered North and South Vietnam. The city of Hue was a cultural and intellectual mecca in South Vietnam. Buddhist monks where very influential

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    throughout history. The Tet offensive was a sneak attack launched by The North Vietnam Army. It is often referred to as the turning point of the war. To try to help the South Vietnamese people, the United States sent troops to help. All was going good for the United States until Tet. Tet is a celebration in Vietnam that marks the Lunar New Year. It is the “most important Vietnamese holiday” (Tet Offensive). The United States had a truce with the Vietnam forces during Tet. During this ceasefire

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    The Tet Offensive

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    The Tet Offensive was a series of battles which took place during the Vietnam War. It was a major offensive by the North Vietnamese Army, and the Viet Cong, beginning on the night of January 30-31, of 1968, which was the Chinese New year. The objective of the 1968 Tet Offensive was to take the Nationalist and the US armies by surprise since North Vietnam's government proposed a ceasefire for the celebration of the Lunar New Year. There were three major battles of the offensive, which we discussed

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    The Vietnam War - The 1968 Tet Offensive For several thousand years, Vietnamese Lunar New Year has been a traditional celebration that brings the Vietnamese a sense of happiness, hope and peace. However, in recent years, It also bring back a bitter memory full of tears. It reminds them the 1968 bloodshed, a bloodiest military campaign of the Vietnam War the North Communists launched against the South. The "general offensive and general uprising" of the north marked the sharp turn of the Vietnam

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    Tet Offensive

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    Tet Offensive Villagers carried coffins filled with guns and ammunition through towns, accompanying them were the sounds of fireworks and flutes. Those sounds soon turned to the sound of assault rifle fire and explosions. Flares and green tracers dart through the night sky like hundreds of fireflies; gun flashes replaced Tet fireworks, and could be seen as far as the eye could see. This major event in the Vietnam War is called the Tet Offensive. After a surprise attack in the beginning, the

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    The Tet Offensive

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    The Tet Offensive was unquestionably the biggest occurrence of the Vietnam War. While the military success of the Viet Cong in mounting a sustained revolt in cities across South Vietnam was virtually non-existent, the psychological impact it had on the American public was quite simply phenomenal. This effect was partially due to the reporting of the war by the media. To completely understand the impacts of Tet, we must first understand the goals of Tet. The execution of Tet was a failure on the battlefield;

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    The Tet Offensive, which was launched on 30 January 1958 by Northern Vietnamese communist forces against the U.S. supported South Vietnamese forces, had the tactical aim of spurring a communist revolt in South Vietnam. This would be achieved by a combination of capturing the city of Saigon and encouraging South Vietnamese citizens to revolt in support of communist forces.1 In addition, this effort had the long-term strategic aim of forcing American forces out of Vietnam by reversing the American

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    Tet Offensive Essay

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    Tet Offensive Before the Tet Offensive, South Vietnam Army (SVA) seems to have the advantage with the help of the United States during the Vietnam War. Westmoreland said, “We have reached a point where the end becomes to come into view” (Willbanks). The US army and SVA were fighting against the Vietcong and North Vietnam Army (NVA). On the verge of defeat, North Vietnam felt pressured to respond back with a heavy attack, leading to the Tet Offensive. The Tet Offensive is a coordinated, surprise attack

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    Effects of the Tet Offensive

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    For nine years, the United States were hell-bent in achieving their rightful victory in Vietnam, however, destiny had different plans for them. The Tet Offensive is considered the turning point of the Vietnam Conflict because of the fact that the Vietcong and North Vietnamese Army surprised the U.S and South Vietnam with several sporadic attacks. Consequently, many effects from these attacks were expected, not only for America, but for North and South Vietnam as well. With U.S citizens’ opinions

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    Television and Its Imapact on Society

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    became a ?television war? because it was said that more citizens were watching the television than the actual war. Journalists began to show ?history through camera lens.? One such journalist is Walter Cronkite. Cronkite visited Vietnam after the Tet Offensive, and publicized his conclusions on national television. His remark that ?the [Vietnam] War can not be won honorably? caused Lyndon B. Johnson to withdraw himself from the Democratic Primary Election. Vocal oppositions to the war pealed out across

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    LBJ and the Vietnam War

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    that the United States was weak. Although these reasons were and are valid, the anti-war movement in conjunction with the Tet offensive required President Johnson to make a decision that changed the perception of the war; he chose to call a halt on the bombardment in Vietnam. The purpose of this essay is to further analyze how the continuing anti-war movement and the Tet Offensive were the reasons that “America’s fate was effectively sealed by mid-1968.” The antiwarriors that have been described in

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    January 1968, North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong launched the largest battle of the Vietnam War, (The Tet Offensive) attacking more than 100 cities/bases/ villages simultaneously with over 80,000 troops. After short-lived losses to many bases/ territories, U.S. and South Vietnamese forces regained their once lost territories. Tactically, the Tet offensive was a huge loss for the North, but it marked a significant turning point in public opinion and political support/ pressure which would lead

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    Tet Offensive Essay

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    and the US, known as the famous “Tet Offensive.” The name “Tet Offensive” is derived from the most important holiday on the Vietnamese calendar. It is a celebration of the lunar New Year. General Vo Nguyen Giap, along with the forces in the north, decided to attack on this day because it is supposed to be a “truce period” between the north and south. On this day, the ARVN (Army of the Republic of Vietnam) was at its lowest level of alertness. (Dunn, 2005) The offensive consisted of three phases. The

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    Vietnam Films

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    As thousands of young men traded in their tees and baseball caps for uniforms and helmets, said good-bye to loved ones, and headed off to Vietnam, many questions were left unanswered as to why the United States was participating in another crusade against communism. For the first time, Americans were able to actually see the devastating effects of the Vietnam War right from the comfort of their own home. Marshall McLuhan, author of Understanding Media and prominent media analyst, once said, "Television

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    Essay On Vietcong

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    grenade; they hooked it to some sort of anchor. After the trap was armed and ready they would camouflage and disguise is so that it was almost unnoticeable to the American soldiers. There are many different types of booby traps, offensive and defensive traps. The offensive was used to stop enemy U.S. troops from moving forward, and the defensive traps were you used to guard the Cu Chi tunnels or anything of importance to the Vietcong. As the American forces learned the hard way, guerilla warfare is

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    The Role of Media During the Vietnam War

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    U.S. Television Newscasts” GRIN Verlag, 2007 McLuhan, Marshall, “The Vietnam War” Montreal Gazette, May 16, 1975. Hammond, William M. “Reporting Vietnam: Media and Military at War”. Lawrence, KS: UP of Kansas, 1998. Hayward, Steven. “The Tet Offensive”. Dialogues. April 2004. Ashland University(Ashbrook). 13 Jan. 2012. Burrows, Larry. “Vietnam: The Darkest Side” Life Magazine. 1 Aug. 1962. Time & Life pictures. 13 Jan 2012. < http://www.life.com/gallery/23010/vietnam-war-disturbing-images#index/0>

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    Have you ever heard the famous saying, “A picture is worth a thousand words?” The pictures taken during the Vietnam War would put that quote to shame; it would produce much more words. The Vietnam War lasted from 1957 to 1975. Ho Chi Minh, the nationalist leader of North Vietnam, strived to make the country communist. However, Hgo Dinh Diem, the autocratic leader of South Vietnam, pushed against Minh to make Vietnam anti-communist. With America being extremely anti-communist, the US government gave

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    viewers the sense of fairness as something wrong is going on. By doing that, the author could convey apprehensions to the viewers to make them feel afraid when hearing this sounds and seeing the injured soldiers. In addition, at the end after the Tet Offensive there was this painful view of the injured soldiers that were coming to the hospital and this created a very sad atmosphere. For instance, Leeann said, “...eighteen years old coming into surgery… and he’s crying--Mommy? Mommy? Mommy? And I’m saying:

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    Vietnam

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    the terrain, the Vietnamese culture, or even how to fight the North Vietnamese. And when they thought that they had things somewhat under control and that they could kind of anticipate the North Vietnamese, the NVA changed everything with the TET offensive. So they ended up pretty much knowing nothing about anything. The war not only hard on the soldiers, but it was also hard on their loved ones. The hardest thing for those who were left behind was the waiting and the not knowing. Wives and parents

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