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Free Romance novel Essays and Papers

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    The Form of Romance Novels

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    Kensington Cluff Mrs. Miller English 12 11 November 2013 The Romance Novel "It is a truth universally acknowledged..." that romance novels are one of the most popular genres, especially among women. Romance was the top-performing category on best-seller lists in 2012, generating 1.438 billion dollars in sales. The genre that began with Pamela, was epitomized by Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, and has become one of the top-selling genres in the United States, has changed only slightly over

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    The Romance Novel Marriage

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    The Romance Novel Marriage From the moment they saw each other they knew they were the perfect pair. They knew instantly that the other was their soul mate. It was love at first sight. This knowledge is followed by amazing sex. Then the ecstatic couple gets married and lives "Happily Ever After." I'm talking about the modern day adult fairy tale, also known as the romance novel. I've been reading these novels since I was in the seventh grade. My first one was titled Bitter Sweet, written by Laverle

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    Nora Roberts: Do romance novels give false expectations of love, romance and relationships to women? Although romance novels are considered to be made up and part of the fiction genre, many women alike take them too seriously and they have been blamed for giving women false expectations of love, romance and relationships. Studies show that some women can become addicted to unreal world that romance novels take them to. Many women have admitted to reading up to thirty romance novels a month. Almost

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    Sex in the Romance Novel

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    fortune, must be in want of a wife.” This is what all romance stories are about, each writer rerunning this idea, moving it to fit into a different time and place, and as our world changes so do our taste in heroes and heroines; possessing a good fortune however doesn’t. But, one of the biggest changes to have occurred in romance writing is the addition of sex, something which in Jane Austin’s day wasn’t thought about, let alone mentioned in a novel. Today sex is more acceptable, and while we tend to

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    I Hate Romance Novels

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    I Hate Romance Novels Let me get one thing straight from the start: I am a huge believer in romance---in the sex you can't get enough of and the person you can't stop thinking about, in fantasies about sharing the dominatrix whip and then some ice cream afterwards, in being turned on by arguments about Lacan and Freud and fights about existentialism and religious doctrine. That's my idea of romance. I prefer the "give and take" to the "giving of the soul." I prefer the knowledgeable lover

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    The history of the romance novel remains lengthy, hotly disputed and obstinately convoluted. This short and thus glaringly incomplete summary will focus on the central works that inspired romance novels, one societal trend that helped the romance novel evolve and gain popularity, and the genre’s emergence into the modern era with the help of Harlequin and Mills & Boon. Regis notes that the romance novel was born of, but not limited to, five notable literary works: Samuel Richardson’s Pamela (1740)

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    Wuthering Heights - Not a Romance Novel Emily Brontë, author of Wuthering Heights, grew up in isolation on the desolate moors of Yorkshire, knowing very few people outside of her family. In the book, Brontë contradicts the typical form of writing at the time, the romance, and instead composed a subtle attack on romanticism by having no real heroes or villians, just perceivable characters, and an added bit of a Gothic sense to the whole thing. Brontë accomplishes this by presenting us with the

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    Contrasting Romance Novels and Pornography: Male and Female Preferences I don’t think I’ve ever read a romance novel, not for school, and certainly not for my own enjoyment. Although I’m not much into pornography either, I get much more excited looking at visual images of attractive women than if I were simply reading about them. Growing up, I remember the opposite to be true for my older sister, who often had romance novels lying around in her room. The contrasts between romance novels and pornography

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    conventions for example, the journey to happy ever after. Conventions of the gothic/horror genre are also found in the novel. The conventions that Rebecca reflects of the romantic genre are those of the characteristics of the hero and heroine (as mentioned above). The heroine is usually innocent and vulnerable with low confidence and low self-esteem. The narrator of the novel also holds these characteristics. The first impression of the hero seems rude, arrogant and insufferable but the heroine

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    Romance Novels and Today's Woman

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    Romance and Todays Woman Romance novels have been a place where women have been allowed to fantasize about the perfect and the ideal life. The novels are usually based on super sexy women who are only missing one thing in their life, the perfect man. The hero is also sexy, self-assured, and single minded in their pursuit of the leading woman. In current times, the romance novel has allowed women to step out of heteronormative behavior and explore their sexuality, where anything goes and their actions

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