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    The Meaning of Referendum A referendum means that the electorate votes on a specific political question which has been referred to them for a direct decision. In a representative democracy, citizens usually govern indirectly by choosing representatives in elections who, for a limited period, take decisions on their behalf on how the country is run. Referendums on the other hand are a form of direct democracy and are sometimes used as a complement to the representative system. There are

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    Development of the referendum on the democratic system Albanian Constitution has adopted the model of representative democracy, putting the election as the most important moment in which states the principle of popular sovereignty. But, it provides referendum as a form of direct democracy. Substantially referendum vote stands to express popular opinion about a law, or on a particular issue. However, by recognizing the referendum, the aim of the constitution has not been the conversion of representative

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    Constitution 1901 was drafted through constitutional conventions held in the 19th century and passed by the UK Parliament. To this day there have only been 8 out of 44 successful referendums to change the Constitution. With such low successful rates ‘Australia is the frozen continent1’ as the last successful referendum was in 1977. However the Constitution allows for advancement through the legitimate process of interpretation and by doing so it relates to the fundamental principles of federalism

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    notable being the 1980 and 1995 Referendums in Quebec. The province has provided its residence, and the larger national population, with a great source of conversation and controversy. The Parti Quécécois introduced both referendums, although the party was under different leadership: Réne Lévesque in 1980 and Jaques Parizeau in 1995. Both were strongly in favor of the provinces secession from Canada. For the citizens and politicians of Quebec during both Referendums, the results speak volumes about

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    Switzerland Immigration Politics

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    direct democracy not only to be the “most crucial institution of the Swiss political system” but also the most developed system of its kind in the world, both in terms of significance and in terms of sheer numbers. Swiss voters took part in 321 referendums between 1960 and 2003, over seven per year on average, by far the most numerous of the 47 nations in the Council of Europe. The importance of direct democracy in ensuring the continued salience of the immigration debate in Switzerland and its impact

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    In this essay I hope to analyse the 31st amendment to the Constitution by firstly, evaluating it's purpose and secondly, comparing it to previous case law and predicting it's legal impact. It is firstly helpful to note that the article being amended is relating to the welfare of children . It is arguable that the, Consitution has prevoiusly failed in it's protection for children and so this amendment is aiming to tackle this failure and offer children stronger protection. Below I will give an evaluation

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    For many years, the question of how adaptable and flexible the constitution is in Australia has been widely debated. As of now the atmosphere of verbal confrontation on protected change, has restored enthusiasm toward the issue in exploring whether the constitution is versatile and adaptable in meeting the needs of the nation following 100 years in being embraced. Many would state that the constitution is not a living document and therefore, it does not change to meet the needs of the nation. One

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    The Arizona Constitution

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    Arizona Constitution Arizona gain statehood on February 14, 1912 as the forty-eighth state in the union. There were several events that led Arizona to statehood. President William Taft vetoed the first document for Arizona to become a state because he did not believe that citizens should use recall to remove judges from office (SU, 2008). This essay will give a detail timeline of the events leading up to Arizona becoming a state and the adoption of the Arizona Constitution. Also, included in this

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    A Constitution is a set of rules put in place to govern a country, by which the parliament, executive and judiciary must abide by in law making and administering justice. In many countries, these laws are easily changed, while in Australia, a referendum process must take place to alter the wording of the Constitution (Commonwealth of Australia, date unknown, South Australian Schools Constitutional Convention Committee 2001). Since the introduction of the Australian Constitution in January 1901, there

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    The Use of Referenda

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    of Referenda A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. This may be the adoption of a new constitution, a constitutional amendment, a law, the recall of an elected official or simply a specific government policy. There are many arguments for and against a referendum. Starting with the positive aspects of a referendum, first of all, referendums are the most legitimate

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