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    Mississippi River

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    The Mississippi river roughly 2,340 miles in length has turned into one of the most active waterways that we know today. According to Cornelia (2006), the Mississippi river once performed like a conveyor belt which transported nutrient-rich sediment downstream and deposited it along the barrier islands and wetlands before the flow of the river was controlled. The U.S Army Corps of Engineers have built dams and levees throughout the river since the 1820s to help protect against flooding. Consequently

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    The History of the Mississippi River Rivers have been extremely important to the history of the world. They have shaped mountains, valleys, and even cultures. Rivers are extremely important to the individuals who live in the areas around them. Native Americans, colonists, and us today use rivers in some way or another. And one of the biggest rivers in American history is of course the Mississippi River. At 2,340 miles long the Mississippi river is the second longest river in the United States. It

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    The Good and Evil of The Mississippi River In the classic novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses symbolism to represent the good and evil of the Mississippi River. Throughout the novel, an uneducated Huckleberry is pulled into two different directions pertaining to what society thinks about African Americans. The racist southern society of St. Petersburg, Missouri or a runaway slave named Jim. Twain symbolizes the Mississippi River greatly whereas it's the ticket to freedom for

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    slave, hopes to achieve the same thing as these two characters meet on Jackson Island. They soon set sail on a journey down the Mississippi River. As the story begins, we see the Mississippi River merely as a means of transportation, but as the story progresses and we learn more about Huck and Jim, we see that it is clearly more than that. For Huck, he is on the river because he feels that he needs to leave his frustrating life in St. Petersburg. Before he starts his journey, he feels confined by

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    Research Paper: Rivers (the Mississippi) The Mississippi River is one of the world 's extraordinary rivers. It is the longest in the United States, more than twenty-three hundred miles in length, as it structures the outskirts of ten states, just about bisecting the mainland (Currie,2003, 8). This waterway has a long history also, and it has touched the lives of numerous individuals. The Mississippi is said to start at Lake Itasca in Minnesota. In 1832, pilgrim Henry Schoolcraft named this lake,

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    Mississippi River History

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    The Mississippi is one of the most important rivers in the United States and probably in North America as a whole. With the Mississippi being one of the most managed rivers that we have, different problems can arise from these management organizations. The Mississippi has a long history when it comes to its life being mingled in with those of humans. Humans have used the Mississippi for navigation, trade, and energy, along with a few other things. The course of this river has taken drastic changes

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    The culture of the Mississippi River has an effect on geography and in turn geography impacts the culture along the Mississippi River. The geography of the Mississippi River provided early settlers with the natural resources to survive and thrive. At the same time the aggressive expansion of culture significantly impacted the Mississippi River’s region. History of settlement along the Mississippi River illustrates the fact that the geography of the river is a natural attraction to settlers. Archeological

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    The unfluctuating outflow of the Mississippi permeates his eardrums, the wind bushes against his crimson cheeks, while the incense of fresh water saturates his nostrils, he distinguishes the boundless hues of cardinal reds and tangerine oranges of an autumn diurnal course adjoining the monumental Mississippi River. Mark Twain, also known as Samuel Langhorne Clemens, is one of America’s greatest authors. Most of Twain’s books involve steamboats and the Mississippi, does this tie to his own personal

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    the Mississippi River through the novel along with a runaway slave named Jim. The Mississippi River serves as symbols of protection, retreat from society, and Huck's true morality. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain contrasts life on water to life on land through Huckleberry's experiences. Mark Twain uses the Mississippi River as a symbol showing protection from danger. Several instances in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn include this contrast of the carefree and safe river and

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    Rivers are often associated with freedom and growth as they are vast and constantly moving and progressing. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is no exception as Mark Twain beautifully paints a picture of a boy who grows significantly during his journey down the Mississippi River. In the beginning of the novel, Huckleberry Finn yearns for his freedom from people who hold him down such as the Widow Douglas and Pap. Ironically, he finds freedom in a place nearby: the river. When he first begins to

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