Free Material Possessions Essays and Papers

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    Material Possessions: A Detrimental Focus of Society Our society is framing the mind of younger generations to believe that your possessions reflect the value and quality of your life. Society is also going as far as to dictate what items these are that make life so much better. I think most parents try to deter their children and teenagers away from this way of thinking. However, it seems that at these ages our children's peers are a more dominant influence. Our children enter elementary

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    very popular, could it be proven wrong? It seems only natural that happiness should flow from having more money. Could material possessions actually increase the happiness of a person? In his essay titled "On Dumpster Diving," Lars Eighner discusses his experience of being homeless and having to resort to living off of other people's unwanted possessions to survive. "Some material things are white elephants that eat up the possessor's substance" (Eighner 263). It is true that a person can not physically

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    losing his job having come back from war, gets involved in the bootlegging business in order to achieve the American Dream. First off, the short story and the movie both reveal the disillusionment of achieving the American Dream through material possessions. For instance, Hanneh’s dream is to have a white kitchen that looks like her rich employer’s, Mrs. Preston. Therefore, the poor lady spends all her money (which she spent a long time saving), to buy the necessary paint to redo her kitchen.

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    Symbolism in The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby tells of a man's attempt to regain his long lost love and the happiness he once had in life by way of wealth and material possessions.  Jay Gatsby is representative of the American man  because he believes that with great wealth comes great happiness.  This is evidenced throughout the novel by way of Gatsby himself, through the portrayal of the Buchanans, and through the use of the word green which symbolizes hope, renewal

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    but Ferlinghetti sees otherwise. Billboards feature material assets in a style showing its necessity for human happiness. By calling this happiness the billboards represent an illusion, Ferlinghetti is speaking out against materialism. This materialism has apparently also horribly disfigured America and it's citizens. The citizens believe that the more material possessions one has the happier they will be. Ferlinghetti says these material possessions such as cars and fancy license plates devour them

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    aristocracy. Despite financial wealth, married women were bound to their husbands-Eliot employs the metaphor of the yoke to convey strict bondage to the spouse and domesticity. On the other hand, an aristocratic married couple was likely bound to material possessions; in the instance of Middlemarch, furniture serves as a complex motif. An analysis on the themes of yoke and furniture in Eliot's novel prompts several questions. What does the definition of yoke imply about the metaphor? Who bears the yoke

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    to get rich in order to win the love of Daisy Buchanan, his long lost love. Despite these beliefs, the American Dream, in it’s modern form, generally fails to make that person happy. As for Gatsby’s dream to win Daisy’s love with elaborate material possessions, his attempts eventually lead to his death. Both the noble intentions and the resulting failures of the American Dream resemble the intentions and corruption of Jay Gatsby in the novel, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald. F. Scott

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    many years prior to pop culture that society in the US was incredibly materialistic and money oriented; maybe someday America would be otherwise. In Brave New World, Huxley puts great detail into the description of this futuristic society's material possessions. Their creator and God was “Ford,” named after the car manufacturer and father of mass production. “Ford” was an incredible symbol of wealth and power, similar to the automobile at the time of publication. Besides Ford, Huxley’s main female

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    of these options and drifts away from those who want to direct his life. Milkman gains his self-awareness after he leaves Southside and travels to Shalimar. The journey through Danville profoundly changes him. He looses or damages all of his material possessions before he leaves Danville. “Milkman is symbolically stripped of all of the things that connect him to his life in Southside”(Davis 225). However, it is in Shalimar that he undergoes spiritual growth and gains se... ... middle of paper ..

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    demonstrate stifling marriage relationships. Big Daddy, though, is one of the most interesting characters in that he illustrates the strange relationship one can have with one's possessions. Watt and Richardson, the editors, state that the play is about "acquisitiveness." That is, the acquiring of material possessions is central to the play, and this family. The Pollitts own a plantation home on the Mississippi Delta. Their house is a key figure in the work as much as any of the characters are

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    personal narrative

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    Growing up as an only child I made out pretty well. You almost can’t help but be spoiled by your parents in some way. And I must admit that I enjoyed it; my own room, T.V., computer, stereo, all the material possessions that I had. But there was one event in my life that would change the way that I looked at these things and realized that you can’t take these things for granted and that’s not what life is about. When I was seventeen years old and going into my senior year of high school I was given

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    is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.” Morrie helps Mitch lead a life consisting of love and happiness rather then material possessions. Morrie taught Mitch to live with the key ingredients of happiness and gave him understanding about what those ingredients are, and how to make them apart of his life. The key ingredient of a happy and successful life, as taught to Mitch

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    Importance of Organizational Behavior

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    relationship between human behavior and the organization. Importance There are many reasons for the importance of organizational behavior in an organization. First, most people are born and educated in organizations, acquire most of the material possessions from organizations, and die as members of organizations. In addition, we can be consumers, employees, or investors in an organization. Second, the study of organizational behavior can greatly clarify the factors that affect how managers manage

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    King Lear as a Commentary on Greed

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    William Shakespeare's King Lear.  Edmund, through his speech, actions, and relationships with other characters, becomes a character consumed with greed to the point that nothing else matters except for the never-ending quest for status and material possessions. Edmund, the bastard son of Gloucester, embodies the idea of avarice from the very beginning of the play almost until the end.  In fact, Edmund seems to become more and more greedy as the production progresses.  When Edmund is first

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    dickinson and angelou

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    appreciation for both success and belongings. Poems 2 and 1036 are two that capture the extent of Dickinson’s feelings on loss. By understanding and comparing these two works, it is easy to recognise that Dickinson believes that possessing neither material possessions nor the joy of success are the real keys to happiness. Poem 2 focuses on a battle that could be considered either literal in the sense of war, or more symbolic as it could act as the anthem for any type of loss or failure. Lines 1 and 2 of

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    man with his plow. Now although its house is gone, the mouse doesn’t seem horribly bothered by it. In the more complex story, the mouse represents the lower class, and the former with the plow represents the upper class. To the lower class material possessions do not surround their life as they do in the lives of the upper class. “The Best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men Gong aft a-gley, An’ lea’ us naught but grief an’ pain, For promised Joy.” Burns starts out life in the lower class, but due to the

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    The images projected by the media in commercials, products, wrote ads etc. give today's consumers an idea of what "normal" should look like (Sellers, M., Waligroski, K., 1993).  The people in the ads would all have the ideal body proportions, material possessions and social status in order to deserve the attention the ad places on them.  Viewers see the ads and compare the body images they see to themselves, which is likely to reveal a discrepancy.  Five years ago, the average female model weighed 23%

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    While Huck and Jim are traveling down the Mississippi River, they meet a variety of people. Throughout the novel he takes on many different tasks which help shape his moral conscience. Taking on a new friend which society shuns, being without material possessions, and taking responsibility for his actions help Huck refine and reform the morals that make him a more mature young man. Huck develops morally from his companion on his journey, Jim, a runaway slave. At first, Huck doesn't respect Jim because

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    The Bluest Eye: The American Way Ownership, class structures, and consumerism go hand in hand. Morrison illustrates this throughout the novel and in the characters' identities. Many of the characters identify themselves based on material possessions: the simple ownership of a car, the use of consumer products, and property ownership. Although African Americans may take these things for granted now, in the early 1900's this would be considered a major accomplishment. There is an apparent contradiction

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    The American people no longer have a sense of individualism. Luxuries have become a necessity instead of a vice and materialism has become a way of life. The characteristics of the modern world surround the importance of the attainment of material possessions and the conformity of its citizens. It also coincides with the destructive nature of mankind. According to Dewey, society is divided into two classes: the working class and the intellectual class. The modern age consists of a “spirit of progress

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