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    The Metaphorical Nature of Harakiri

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    that piece this metaphor together are the original situation leading to the death of Motome Chijiiwa, the final fight between House Iyi and Tsugumo Hanshiro, and the end of Tsugumo Hanshiro in conjunction with the conclusion. The director, Masaki Kobayashi, has also inserted minute elements that give this argument a slightly more solid backbone. Chijiiwa is of the warrior class, educated, and desperate for survival. He serves as a guardian in a time when no guardians are actually needed. He is then

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    Samurai Rebellion

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    Only in the ending of the film are shown another frame shot towards the sky or the outside of the compound. During this portion of the film Kobayashi gives us visual hints that not only confirm the presence of restriction, but its particular quantity and qualities in a given scene or portion of the plot. An example for instance, in his first meeting with the flight attendent of the clan leader

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    Comparison Of Racism In History

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    similarities and differences of racism and racial issues between a “true-story'; novel called Obasan, by Joy Kogawa, and a fictional play called “The Komagata Maru Incident';, by Sharon Pollock. Each story is set in a different period during Canada’s history: World War I and II. In the play “The Komagata Maru Incident';, Sharon tells a story of the racist Canadian Government. The setting of the play is in Vancouver and it takes place right after World War I. It’s about

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    The Star Trek television series was truly a groundbreaking show not just for its plot lines and ideological messages, but also for its revolutionary cast. Two of the main actors were Jewish, one main actor was a gay Asian, and of course, one was a black woman. Uhura was one of the first main black characters on a television show – and of course, her kiss with Kirk was the first interracial kiss ever on television. For a show in the 1960s, Star Trek broke many barriers across religious, racial, but

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