Free King Philip's War Essays and Papers

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    King Philip’s War

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    King Philip’s War In 1675, the Algonquian Indians rose up in fury against the Puritan Colonists, sparking a violent conflict that engulfed all of Southern New England. From this conflict ensued the most merciless and blood stricken war in American history, tearing flesh from the Puritan doctrine, revealing deep down the bright and incisive fact that anger and violence brings man to a Godless level when faced with the threat of pain and total destruction. In the summer of 1676, as the violence

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    Book Review The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity Our history books continue to present our country's story in conventional patriotic terms. America being settled by courageous, white colonists who tamed a wilderness and the savages in it. With very few exceptions our society depicts these people who actually first discovered America and without whose help the colonists would not have survived, as immoral, despicable savages who needed to be removed by killing

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    King Philips War

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    King Philip's War: A Civil War Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary defines war as "a state of widespread conflict between states, organizations, or relatively large groups of people, which is characterized by the use of violent, physical force between combatants or upon civilians", and civil war as "war between factions of the same country." More specifically, a civil war is an internalized war between people who inhabit the same territory. During the 1600's, where newly forming America consisted

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    lifestyle. Conflict among the Wampanoag was limited to minor tribal disputes. The war methods of the Indians were in fact more civilized than the British methods. The close living quarters of the British and Indians forced the Indians to adopt aspects of British civilization in order to survive, such as the ways of warfare. Douglas Leach in his book Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in the time of King Philip's War argues that British influence on Indian society turned the Indians from savage to

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    religious affiliations, all had their own religious convictions that allowed them to see things in their own way. From the account of Mary Rowlandson, a devoted Puritan colonial American woman who was captured by Native Americans during the King Philip's War to the story of Bartholomè De Las Casas, a bishop that saw the treatment towards Native Americans and pushed for social reforms, w... ... middle of paper ... ...rself to see their Native Americans as GOD’S creation. For others they used their

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    King Philip

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    King Philip’s War was a disturbing war fought in America in 1675, almost certainly as a result of the early contact between the English Colonists and the Native Americans. The Natives were, and had always been fighting for their freedom and land, as well as their culture unharmed. Though the Natives had their own religious beliefs, the Colonists felt that they were the greater man, and that God would play a part by remaining on their side. The Natives did not trust the English with their multiple

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    America's Most Devastating Conflict

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    America's Most Devastating Conflict King Philip’s War (1675-76) is an event that has been largely ignored by the American public and popular historians. However, the almost two-year conflict between the colonists and the Native Americans in New England stands as perhaps the most devastating war in this country’s history. One in ten soldiers on both sides were wounded or killed. At its height, hostilities threatened to push the recently arrived English colonists back to the coast. And, it took

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    biggest reasons that people were leaving England was for religious freedom. The harsh church of England had in recent years become protestant. King Henry the VIII had separated from the Roman Catholic church and declared himself the head of the church so that he could divorce his first wife, Katherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn. For years there were wars throughout Europe as Protestantism became more pronounced, and the Christians fought against it. The emigrants coming to the new world were often

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    Jamestown: The Virginia Company, a joint stock company, received a charter from King James I in 1606 with the intention of making a settlement in the New World. The charter of the Virginia Company guaranteed the settlers the same rights of Englishmen back in England. On May 24, 1607 105 English settlers, all of them men, landed to settle Jamestown. Jamestown, named in honor of King James I, became the English settlement in the New World. Virginia was founded to offer and expand a market for trade

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    The Sovereignty and Goodness of God

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    Goodness of God is a primary source document written in the 17th century, by a well-respected, Puritan woman. This book, written in cahoots with Cotton and Increase Mather, puritan ministers, tells the story of her capture by Indians during King Phillip’s War (1675-1676). For three months, Mary Rowlandson, daughter of a rich landowner, mother of three children, wife of a minister, and a pillar of her community lived among “savage” Indians. This document is important for several reasons. First

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    themselves inhabiting the land first and being able to live their cultivating, hunting, fishing, etc. alone without “micromanagement” from the Colonists. Ordeal, in terms how really contradicting it may seem towards the Colonists when they decapitated King Philip’s head from his body as an “act of God.” And lastly, it may have been a time of opportunity. The Indians sailed looking for land first, they ate their own home-grown food, they gain respect from virtually everyone, they ruled in power, etc. However

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    Rowlandson’s Narrative

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    Mary White’s family was among the original settlers of Lancaster, Massachusetts, arriving in 1653. In 1656 Mary White married Joseph Rowlandson, Lancaster's first minister. In 1675, the King Philip’s War began subjecting settlements to attack by Indians. On February 20, 1676, Indians abducted Mary Rowlandson during an attack on Lancaster. She was held captive for eleven weeks finally being ransomed for twenty pounds. After Rowlandson’s return, she recorded the account of her captivity as a narrative

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    Problems Of 1675

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    During the years of 1675 and 1676 the North American colonies experienced conflicts that shaped the dynamics of their colonial life. King Phillip's War would effectively end relations between the New England colonists and the Indians. Also, the rebellion in Virginia led by Nathaniel Bacon stressed the growing discontent of poor frontier farmers for British rule. The consequences of these two events clearly had an impact on different levels that would extend well beyond their time. Therefore,

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    confinement by the Indians. She is abducted from her home in Lancaster, Massachusetts and is taken to what is currently Brooksville, Massachusetts. This capture was during the three year King Philip's War which went from 1675-1678 and was over the course of three months which is the time period the document focuses on. This war was started by the Indians as retaliation for having to live under colonial rule but the Indians lost 35% more of their men than the colonists lost. In the end it just weakened them

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    The Name of War

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    The Name of War In this historical and culturally divided book, Jill Lepore examines and tries to define the King Philips War and how people wrote about it. At the beginning of the colonies it was a start of a “New England" and after the King Philip’s War with all of the religious conflicts and war stories, a new American identity was born. Throughout this book she tells gruesome tales about murders, massacres, and battles. Even thought his book jumps a lot in chronically order she successfully

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    Mary Rowlandson

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    Thursday, February 10, 1675/76 -- A state of alertness prevailed in the town of Lancaster, Massachusetts. Its 50 families were always ready to crowd into the 5 or 6 garrison houses in case of an Amerindian attack. The continual war between King Philip's forces and colonial troops made everyone aware of imminent danger. Joseph Rowlandson, minister to the small frontier town, was in Boston appealing, once again, to the colonial government for protection. His appeal fell on deaf ears; the danger from

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    not a choice but rather something is forced. In circumstances such as being taken hostage, the ability to survive must come at the price of assimilating one's own customs into another lifestyle. In February of 1675 the Native Americans who were at war with the Puritans obtained hostage Mary Rowlandson of the Plymouth colony. During this time she must perform a role that is uncommon to a colonial woman's way of life so that she may live among them. With the need to survive, how can a person accommodate

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    Hidden Victims

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    touch on it briefly, if at all; The war lasted only about fourteen months; and yet the towns of Brookfield, Lancaster, Marlborough, Medfield, Sudbury, Groton, Deerfield, Hatfield, Hadley, Northfield, Springfield, Weymouth, Chelmsford, Andover, Scituate, Bridgewater, and several other places were wholly or partially destroyed, and many of the inhabitants were massacred or carried into captivity. (Hudson) Some historians have called it the “deadliest war in our history." Whose history is it though

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    Captivity Narrative”, Rowlandson recounts her experiences as a captive of the Wampanoag tribe. The tribe took captives from Lancaster in 1676 because of the ongoing violent altercations between the English colonists and Native Americans during King Philip’s War. Since many of the Native Americans brethren had fallen in battle, they saw it fit to take English folk captive and use them to take the place of their fallen brethren, trading/ransom pieces, or killing them in revenge. This was becoming a

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    The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson is a personal account, written by Mary Rowlandson in 1682, of what life in captivity was like. Her narrative of her captivity by Indians became popular in both American and English literature. Mary Rowlandson basically lost everything by an Indian attack on her town Lancaster, Massachusetts in 1675; where she is then held prisoner and spends eleven weeks with the Wampanoag Indians as they travel to safety. What made this piece

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