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    The Island

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    The Island (based on Lord of the Flies) Having crashed onto this unknown island, survival seemed almost inevitable, especially after the deaths of the pilot and our English teacher Mrs. Ammon. All 15 pupils of the grade 10a had miraculously survived the crash. This led to a unity among the class, which eventually deteriorated. Everybody was in a state of shock, and it took some time for everybody to find one another. The last person to be found was Jasper Kessel, who had jumped into tree, in

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    Gilligan’s Island

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    Gilligan’s Island No inhabitants, a major tourists spot, a clear blue ocean, but no sign of the Professor, the Skipper, or Mary Ann. Can you guess where this is? You got it! Gilligan’s Island located in the beautiful South Atlantic Ocean. During Spring Break of 2003, my best friend, Danielle, and I took a flight to Orlando, Florida, a car to Fort Lauderdale, and a cruise through the Bahamas that had beautiful subtropical weather. For one day out of four during the cruise, we were able to chose

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    Ellis Island

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    Ellis Island In the 1600's, Ellis Island was known as Gull Island by the Mohegan tribe and was simply two to three acres. During high tide, the island could barely have been seen above the rising waters. After being discovered for its rich oyster beds in 1628, Dutch settlers renamed it Oyster Island. And then in 1765, which was the hanging of Anderson the Pirate, the island was again renamed the Gibbet Island, after the instrument used to hang him. Finally on January 20, 1785, Samuel Ellis purchased

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    The Island of Aruba

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    The Island of Aruba From Aruba’s discovery at the end of the thirteenth century to present-day, its history is filled with change. Its changing possession and the three economic booms that it experienced form the outline of thousands of years. The changes the island has gone through are truly remarkable, and it is unbelievable that the island that now seems to be saturated with tourism was once a desolate landscape with little agricultural promise and economic hope. Unfortunately Aruba’s

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    The Caribbean Islands

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    "The Caribbean" The Caribbean, a region usually exoticized and depicted as tropical and similar in its environmental ways, cannot be characterized as homogenous. Each individual island has their own diverse historical background when it comes to how and when they became colonized, which European country had the strongest influence on them, and the unique individual cultures that were integrated into one. The three authors Sidney W. Mintz, Antonio Benitez-Rojo, and Michelle Cliff, all and address

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    The Island of Jamaica

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    The Island of Jamaica The island of Jamaica is the third largest Caribbean island. It is in a group of islands called the greater antilles. It has an area of 10 991 km squared or 4 244 sq. miles. Jamaica spans 230 km east to west and from 80-36 from north to south. It is third only to Cuba, which is the largest, and Hispaniola which is the second largest island. Jamaica lies in the Caribbean sea which is a part of the much larger Atlantic ocean. The island is 960 km south of Florida

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    self-determination. The documentary, Alcatraz is Not an Island, describes the occupation that made Alcatraz a symbol for Indigenous people as motivation to stand up against the cruelty that they have experienced since the arrival of the Europeans. Hence the name of the film, Alcatraz can be seen as an inspiration for Indigenous people rather than an island. The first attempt to occupy Alcatraz took place in 1964 when a group of four Native Americans landed on the island and claimed it for four hours before the

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    Boracay Island

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    place to visit on the face of this planet; the island paradise of Boracay in the Philippines. Boracay Island combines crystal clear waters, sugary beaches that squeak, and lush hilly landscapes into an idyllic tourist haven, that's guaranteed to fascinate anyone into tranquil harmony with its simplistic beauty. Boracay is a breath-taking, unbelievably magical Island. A spectacular paradise set in the unspoiled South China Seas. Boracay Island is a paradise indeed. The beach is amazing with

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    Parris Island

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    PARRIS ISLAND “GET OFF MY BUS. YOU HAVE TEN SECONDS TO GET YOUR THINGS, GET OFF MY BUS, AND GET ON THE FOOTPRINTS OUTSIDE.” It was the middle of the night, we had just arrived by bus from the airport and we were scared to death. Welcome to Marine Corps Recruiting Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina. This is a brief overview of Parris Island as seen through the eyes of Recruit Smith, Platoon 1040, B Company. Marine Corps boot camp is thirteen weeks of physical and mental

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    Easter Island

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    Easter Island was once a haven for its inhabitants. It provided them with all of their needs, food, shelter, tools, and even the ability to create great works of art. They abused this Eden, and turned it into a disaster, with almost no natural resources. This could very well happen to us, because our earth is the same Eden that Easter Island once was. The people of Easter Island came over to their new land, and recognized that it was ideal for them to settle. The land was lush; the sea was providing

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