Free Influenza Epidemic Essays and Papers

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    War and Influenza Epidemic

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    A View from the Chelsea Naval Hospital BOSTON, September 12, 1918 Dear Journal, The Great War rages on. An influenza epidemic claims the lives of several Americans. But, the Boston Red Sox have done it again. Last night, in a 2-1 victory over the Chicago Cubs at Fenway Park (thanks to Carl Mays' three-hitter), the Boston Red Sox won their fifth World Series championship--amid death and disease, a reason to live ... Babe Ruth and the 1918 Red Sox. If I die today, at least I lived to see

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    The Spanish Influenza Epidemic

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    The Spanish Influenza Epidemic Los Angeles, October 28--The effects of the Spanish influenza outbreak from its date of original contamination, September 13(1), to now have been widespread and horrific. With more than 4500 new cases being reported today, the total for California is now above 60,000.(7) Not even two days prior to this printing, San Francisco witnessed its worst day, with over 2000 new cases reported accompanied by 96 deaths.(6) The once thought of "army epidemic" now has a firm

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    Influenza Epidemic of 1918

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    The epidemic began at around the end of the first World War and was the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. Some symptoms of the influenza included muscle pains, sore throat, headache, fever, glandular disturbances, eye aberrations, heart action slowing, and depression of all bodily functions and reactions. The flu is highly contagious and spreads around easily whenever an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. This global disaster was nicknamed the “Spanish Flu,” or “La Grippe

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    The 1918 Influenza Epidemic

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    million individuals worldwide (Barry, 2004). Only after the fall wave of the 1918 influenza did it become a requirement to report cases of influenza thus information on this first wave is sporadic at best (Kolata, 1999). I will argue that the nature of this missing data combined with the biology of the virus itself could explain a fascinating phenomenon that cropped up in the infection rate data for the 1918 influenza, that despite significantly poorer living conditions, African-Americans were significantly

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    Influenza A: Pandemics and Epidemics

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    Title Influenza is a serious some time deadly disease that has global circulation and occurs yearly from the late autumn to the early spring and is most commonly referred to as the flu (Bridges, CB. 2002; Rüttimann, R. W., Bonvehí, P. E., Vilar-Compte, D., Isturiz, R. E., Labarca, J. A., & Vidal, E. I., 2013; Pleschka, S., Ludwig, S., Planz, O., & Wolff, T. 2009). There are three genera of influenza: A, B and C (CDC, 2014; Duncan, D 2013). Influenza A and B are the most common infections, furthermore

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    1918 Influenza Epidemic

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    Whereas normal flu struck down the young and old, or the weak, the 1918 flu struck down those in the prime of health. During 1918, American soldiers carried the disease to European trenches, where it was dubbed Spanish Flu after an epidemic in said country. Influenza normally has an attack rate of 5-10% in adults and 20-30% in children and occurs all over the globe. It is transmitted primarily by droplets or respiratory secretions, and a pandemic is a rare, but recurrent event. Scientists worked

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    The 1918-1919 Influenza Epidemic

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    the world claiming victims at an unprecedented rate. The 1918-1919 influenza pandemic stretched its lethal tentacles all over the globe, even to the most remote areas of the planet, killing fifty million people or possibly even more. Influenza killed more people in a year than the Black Death of the Middle Ages killed in a century, and it killed more people in twenty-four weeks than AIDS has killed in twenty-four years.3 Influenza normally kills the elderly and infants, but this deadly and abnormal

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    The Influenza and Pneumonia Epidemic of 1918-1919 In the ten months between September 1918 and June 1919, 675,000 Americans died of influenza and pneumonia. When compared to the number of Americans killed in combat in World War I, World War II, Korea, and Vietnam combined- 423,000- it becomes apparent that the influenza epidemic of 1918-1919 was far more deadly than the war which it accompanied. (Crosby, 206-207) The United States and the rest of the world had been exposed to such epidemics in

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    The social effects of the influenza epidemic of 1918 were severe: (1) The medical and scientific communities had to develop new theories and “apply them to prevention, diagnostics and treatment of the influenza patients” (Barry, 234). Something that, until then, no pandemic had forced (or allowed) such a collaboration. (2) In some cities and towns residents were required to wear surgical masks to protect themselves from the virus because influenza can penetrate even tightly woven clothing. (3) Children

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    New York Better Protected From Influenza Epidemic NEW YORK--These past few warring years have left the nations of the world in various stages of devastation and destruction, and the world population has been decimated by battles and disease. Here, in New York, we definitely see the outcomes of the war on the economy and industry, and unfortunately, the citizens of New York are also not safe from the deadly Spanish influenza epidemic that has been sweeping the globe. Even though the New York

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    New York City Fighting Influenza

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    New York City Fighting Influenza New York City's public health officials are pioneering a program to reduce the spread of the influenza epidemic that hit the city over one month ago. The city's approach to disease control is unlike that of any other city in the nation and has been met with much criticism and fear for the lives of New Yorkers. The city's Health Commissioner, Dr. Royal S. Copeland, has refused to close schools, theaters, churches, and places of "public amusement" despite many

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    Native Americans

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    people suffered first from the introduction of diseases that were common in the regions that the settlers were from, to which the Indians had no immunity. It is believed that millions died of smallpox, measles, whooping cough, and influenza. Some estimate that such epidemics were responsible for more than 80 million deaths during the early colonial period alone. Although The Indians numbers were never accurately recorded (estimates have ranged from in the low millions to as much as around a hundred

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    Solar Energy

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    Solar Energy What do the bubonic plague in the 14th century, the influenza epidemic of the early 20th century and the spread of HIV/AIDS in the late 20th and early 21st centuries have in common? One answer, according to Joel B. Stronberg author of the American Solar Energy Society’s “Common Sense,” is that they have all been called pandemics. According to Merriam-Webster.com, a pandemic occurs over a wide geographic distribution and affects “an exceptionally high proportion of the population.”

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    A Clockwork Orange

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    values which will allow him to mature into a “man” in the latter of his two transformations. Anthony Burgess was born in Manchester, England on February 25, 1917.  When he was a child of one-year-old his mother and sister passed away due to the influenza epidemic.  He continued living with his father who soon was remarried to the owner of a pub.  Anthony’s father played piano at the pub and Anthony began composing his own music at the early age of fourteen  In 1940 Burgess joined the army and was put

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    arduous lives endured by turn-of-the-century Appalachians, Moran Laskas serves up a novel that journeys between sorrow and triumph without ever indulging in sentimentality as her characters try to survive poverty, mountain life, a world war, an influenza epidemic, and the Depression. With image-rich descriptions of Appalachia’s natural landscape, Moran Laskas shares the stirring, at times comic, rural language of Elizabeth and the novel’s other midwives, Elizabeth’s mother and maternal grandmother, to

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    Influenza and War

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    Influenza and War This week, influenza and the war continue to affect Manchester, causing mayhem as well as celebration within the county. Manchester residents, from toddlers to elders, bravely face the influenza epidemic onslaught and stand triumphant with minimal fatality. Unfortunately, the influenza epidemic did impact Manchester's social, economic and military life but without detrimental results.... Influenza, the Illness After careful observation by medical specialists around the

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    Influenza Fever

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    Influenza Fever DUBLIN, Ireland--It seems as though this year is not a good year for people as we have the big war going on and at home, people are stuck with a disease that the doctors do not know how to make it stop spreading. The epidemic has reached a boiling point as everyone is affected by this disease and it does not matter whether the person lives in Dublin, Ireland or Frankfurt, Germany, the disease still spreads. People dreaded to hear that they have been infected by that disease,

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    Influenza in New York City

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    Influenza in New York City NEW YORK--The Influenza epidemic arrived in the city last month, and it has remained a constant presence since then. The epidemic, which is now present in most major cities in America, lingers in and around the city, affecting everyone. Dr. Copeland, Health Commissioner Royal, has declared influenza to be a reportable disease. Influenza presents itself in a manner not unlike a cold: runny nose, chills, fever, coughing, sneezing. Influenza is a stronger version

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    The Movement of Disease

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    have helped to advance their societies. Unfortunately, these movements are also responsible for the transmission of numerous diseases and their resulting adverse effects upon the inhabitants of the Earth. This essay seeks to outline the causes of epidemic diseases, explain their diffusion around the world, and explore why they are more harmful in certain societies. During the First Great Transition, small mobile groups of hunter-gatherers began to adopt sedentary lifestyles. This was facilitated

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    Throughout history, diseases have caused devastating epidemics amongst communities. Today, infectious diseases are still spread among groups of people and have had the greatest impact in areas such as the Amazon region where interactions between tourists and the indigenous people have introduced new diseases. By examining first-hand accounts and studies, one may be able to determine the results of this danger, and formulate a key to preventing it. A potential solution may lie in the improvement

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