Free Film director Essays and Papers

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    The Job of a Film Director The film director has an elaborate job, classed as an art in its own sense. Its meticulous details and multi million dollar bills at the end make a director's job truly an art. How they can take the imagination and lay it on a roll of film is an array of elaborate casting, screening etc. and requires a special skill. The general meaning of the word director is: · The leader

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    Directors in Modern Film

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    gravitation toward film as my primary medium was a gradual process, the result of my lifelong fascination with storytelling and a steady diet of movie-watching throughout my adolescence. There was a time that I was intimidated by the narrow percentage of people that appear to achieve notable success in the film industry. I thought that being a movie director was one of the dream jobs that many aspired to but few ever achieved. However, as I've learned more about the business of film, I've discovered

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    being a director as a life choice is that it can never be mastered. Every story is its own kind of expedition, with its own set of challenges” (“Filmmaker IQ” 2). The Academy Award winning director, Ron Howard, said this quote. Directing a film is a well know job around the world. Movies have brought happiness to millions of people around the world. Directors are the main force behind the creation of this happiness. However, this job is not easy. Film directors are people that pull all of the film together

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    Film Director A director is someone who directs the makings of a film. They are the creative forces that drive the team forward, from deciding the film’s artistic and dramatic aspects, to visualizing the script, it is their job to guide the cast and crew to achieve their vision for the particular film, making the film what it is. Directors play a key role in the film making process. Film Directors have many responsibilities and duties that they will need to fulfil. Directors are responsible for

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    interest in film, television, and broadcast journalism. After my first few weeks in the class, I was hooked. Now, I have been taking media arts courses for over three years. Because of my experience in film and television production, my love for art and creativity, and the joy obtained from entertaining other people, I want to be a film director. While majoring in theater at LSU with a film and television concentration, I will gain valuable skills necessary to create major shows and films, and I will

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    essay I will be discussing whether female filmmakers in Britain find it easier to make a documentary feature than a fiction feature film in the current British film industry. I will be referring to the opinions and films of Kim Longinotto, Carol Morley, Clio Barnard and Alison Stirling. I will also be looking at the statistics from film festivals and the British Film Institute, and interviews with various British female filmmakers. I will argue that documentaries are easier to make due to them being

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    The Romantic Notion of a Film Director

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    intention of this essay is to discuss the romantic notion of a film director who has etched their own cinematic vision into the body of their film work, and whether the theory and practice is dead and an infringement of the spectator’s imagination and is it the spectator who finds meaning in the film. I will be closely looking at critical material, primarily André Bazin and Roland Barthes and applying them to several case study films directed by Christopher Nolan including The Following (1998), The

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    George Lucas is an incredible film director. He has created some of the most memorable movies. How did George Lucas become a film director, and why did he create these movies.George Lucas said,”I’ve always been interested in where we come from,who we are and what’s happened; obviously history has some great stories”. George Lucas was born May 14, 1944 in Modesto, California, USA. He was born on a ranch and was the son of a small-town stationer and a mother who was often hospitalised for long

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    and cinematographers within the motion picture industry, there are the film directors: masterful storytellers, skilled visionaries, the glue holding the basis of production together. Among such examples are the Martin Scorseses, Alfred Hitchcocks, and Quentin Tarantinos of Hollywood, well respected icons who are appreciated and studied by those interested in the craft of filmmaking. I, a hopeful amateur currently studying film, do not (and should not) expect to easily reach the ranks of such idols

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    differences in several of the scenes will become apparent, although the scene layout and plot remains the same throughout both versions. The very first difference is probably the most noticeable and important difference between the two versions of the film: the narration of Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) at various spots throughout the original version. Scott chose to keep this out for a really good reason. Most think that having a narration is simply a way of cheating in your movie. Narration is pretty

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    Women Directors of Horror Films

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    once said people love watching horror films simply because it keeps their sanity. “It may be that horror movies provide psychic relief on this level because this invitation to lapse into simplicity, irrationality and even outright madness is extended so rarely” (King). When people see a slasher film it gives them a chance to kill off “Annoying Bob” from the office in their heads. Horror films also tell the story about the culture watching them.“Horror films are to an observer of culture what frogs

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    Zach Love Kon Satoshi: Director of the Surreal My paper focuses on Kon Satoshi’s four anime movies that he directed. They are, in order of release, Perfect Blue (1997), Millennium Actress (2001), Tokyo Godfathers (2003), and Paprika (2006.) While I plan to analyze these movies from multiple angles, one of the main overarching topics will of course be Kon’s trademark surrealism. The way Kon blends realistic portrayals with other dream-like sequences is very interesting. These are honestly not

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    Comparing the Directors of the Film Huckleberry Finn Like most enchanting novels, Hollywood directors desire to create a film about a classic novel. Such was the case with the American classic: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Two directors took upon the goal of producing a visual aid for the morally impacting novel. Peter Hunt was the first to accept this challenge and with his directing abilities, he created a move that was about 4 hours long. On the other, a director from Disney,

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    any film is to give the audience what they want. In terms of the uses and gratification theory it is to entertain your target audience, to give them information to consume, personally identify with characters the antagonists and protagonists and in modern day terms usually to portray a message of some kind. The purpose of most generic films should be to make a profit and to engage with the audience to ultimately gain your intended objective. From this philosophy brings the role of the director, from

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    Analysis of the Ways the Director Builds Suspense in the Opening to the Film Jaws Steven Spielberg directed the film “Jaws” in 1975. He has directed many other successful films, which include ET, Indiana Jones, Minority Report, Schindlers List and Saving Private Ryan. However it was “Jaws” which made Spielberg into a successful director. He is now recognised as one of Hollywood’s leading filmmakers. Jaws broke box office records when it came out in cinemas in 1975 and is considered a classic

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    American Film Director: Quientin Tarantino

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    American Film director, screenwriter, producer, and actor (Erlewine, Stephan). Tarantino is a man of talent who has contributed to film history with his creativity, knowledge, and motivation. Many people may be familiar with him because of his most recent movie, Django Unchained, which came out in 2012 ("Quentin Tarantino Awards and Nominations”). As a high school dropout, Tarantino has faced many challenges and has worked hard to overcome those challenges, becoming a successful man in the film industry

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    Akira Kurosawa and Robert Zemeckis

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    such as film, deciding on authorship is much more complicated. Generally speaking, film theorists have concluded that it is the director of a film who is the auteur, the most important creative figure. But auteur theory is concerned with more that one film; it is concerned with the work of a director – with his or her whole corpus of films, and with certain dominant themes and stylistic aspects of these films. The text in auteur criticism is not one film, but the body of work of the director.” Although

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    The concept of "Auteur" is deriding and damaging to the screenwriter and to the director, according to William Goldman because Goldman understands that there are many independent parts working together to create a movie. Screenwriter, such as Goldman, have a very difficult task to adapt the script and the storyline in such a way that the whole story can be told with themes and symbolism without losing the viewer and without giving the viewer too much to take in and grapple with. Screenwriters such

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    Is3350 Unit 1 Assignment

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    of an auteur director. I found this a difficulty because of that fact that I felt it was restricting how the project could be filmed, that on top of the fact that I struggle to work alone when it comes to a project that consists of making a short film by myself made this assignment prove difficult. At first, I was working on my own project. The premise of my project was to produce a short four minute film based off of the style of Edgar Wright's films. The unfinished plot of the film consisted of

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    establish director Stanley Kubrick as one of the most innovative filmmakers of all time. For him film must be a work of art, and art exists for its own sake. The film has no goal beyond its own enjoyment. Given its subject matter—political corruption, hedonism, violence, and the elusiveness of moral certitudes—one might even go so far as to call A Clockwork Orange a nihilistic film in both form and content. This style of filmmaking would later heavily influence the “New Hollywood” directors. The film

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