Evacuation Of Children Essays

  • Evacuation Of Children in WW2

    1029 Words  | 3 Pages

    Evacuation Of Children in WW2 During World War 2, many children were moved from areas that were at risk from bombing. The children had to leave their families and go to live with strangers in less dangerous parts of the country. This was called "evacuation". Foster parents usually took their children. However, many discovered that life away from home was no picnic. Some thought it would be fun and exciting, like an adventure. All the younger boys thought it was a holiday, but not sure why

  • The Evacuation of All Children From Britain's Large Cities

    627 Words  | 2 Pages

    The Evacuation of All Children From Britain's Large Cities In 1939 the Second World War broke out. The government made plans for the evacuation of all children from Britain's large cities. Sir john Anderson, who was placed in charge of the scheme, decided to divide the country into three areas: evacuation (people living in urban districts where heavy bombing raids could be expected); neutral (areas that would neither send nor take evacuees) and reception (rural areas where evacuees would

  • Assessment of the British Evacuation of Children During World War II

    700 Words  | 2 Pages

    of the British Evacuation of Children During World War II The main aim of evacuation was to protect Britain’s children form the threat of a German Blitz. Between the 1st and 3rd of September 1939 over 1.5 children, pregnant women and disabled people were evacuated to rural areas in mainland Britain. In my essay I am going to determine weather or not this objective was met and look at many different sources to see if there is any conflict in opinion. Whether evacuation was or was not

  • The Evacuation of British Children During World War Two

    1326 Words  | 3 Pages

    The Evacuation of British Children During World War Two The evacuation of Britain's cities at the start of World War Two was the largest movement of people in Britain's history. In the first four days of September 1939, nearly 3,000,000 people were transported from towns and cities. The Government’s aim was to reduce the risk of injuries and death from the main target areas such as London, Manchester, Bristol, Portsmouth and many other cities. The danger came from German bomber attacks over

  • The Evacuation of British Children During World War Two

    765 Words  | 2 Pages

    Reasons Leading to the Evacuation of Children from Britain's Major Cities Early in World War Two The evacuation of Britain's cities at the start of World War Two was the biggest and most concentrated mass movement of people in Britain's history. Two days before the war broke out on the 1st September 1939, children & pregnant women started to evacuate from all major cities such as London, Liverpool and Sheffield. In the first four days of September 1939, nearly 3,000,000 people were transported

  • Evacuation Of British Children During World War 2 Essay

    1907 Words  | 4 Pages

    Evaluation of the Success of the Evacuation of British Children During World War II Source Based In this essay I will evaluate a number of sources and compare them with my own knowledge. This will help me answer the question, do you agree or disagree with the interpretation, 'Evacuation was a great success.' Evacuation started at the beginning of World War Two and involved children that lived in cities that were under threat from the Luftwaffe. The aim of the government

  • The Evacuation of Children From Britain's Major Cities During World War II

    704 Words  | 2 Pages

    The Evacuation of Children From Britain's Major Cities During World War II During the First World War, the home front in England did not experience the terrible warfare that was happening in France. The only experience the civilians had was the starvation due to the food shortages they were facing. There were no bombs dropped on the main cities, particularly because the air technology had not reached an advanced enough stage. On 1st September 1939, war was declared between Britain and

  • Evaluation of the Success of the Evacuation of Children from Major British Cities during World War II

    1156 Words  | 3 Pages

    Evaluation of the Success of the Evacuation of Children from Major British Cities during World War II Before discussing how successful evacuation was it must first be asked, how is success measured? Evacuation may have succeeded for some, but failed for others. Some groups of society may have benefited from it, others may have become worse off because of it. In some ways evacuation was a great success. The government introduced evacuation in 1939 to save people's lives and this was achieved;

  • Evaluating the Success of the Evacuation

    943 Words  | 2 Pages

    Success of the Evacuation Evacuation was what took place in order to prevent people being killed or injured due to the heavy bombing of major cities during the war. 1,474,000 schoolchildren, mothers and children, handicapped people, teachers and pregnant women were moved from areas prone to bombing to countryside areas by the government. 2 million people were also evacuated privately, staying with friends and relatives away from the cities in 1939. The first evacuation was brought into

  • Source Evaluation on Evacuation

    1001 Words  | 3 Pages

    Source Evaluation on Evacuation To some, evacuation was seen as a happy, adventurous time for children during World War Two, but in fact, children and their parents suffered from being apart and for many, evacuation was a painful and unforgettable experience. The photograph (Source B) shows us a picture of children and some adults on their way to a station in London in September of 1939. We can not be sure how accurate source B is and it is difficult to comment on as it is hard to interpret

  • Evacuation in the Second World War

    1384 Words  | 3 Pages

    Evacuation in the Second World War Evacuation is defined in Collins dictionary as being 'a movement from a dangerous area, especially in time of war'. Surely this is a good solution to the enemies' bombing. It was a fast and effective process, 1st September 1939 saw 1.5million people moving to safer areas. As successful as this sounds many began to filter home within weeks. Homesickness drove some, hard labour enforced by the foster parents drove others, but mothers fetched the majority

  • Evacuation

    599 Words  | 2 Pages

    Evacuation The evacuation has got to do with the movement of vulnerable people and children out of the city and into the country sides in case if the country starts getting bombed. The evacuation plan began in the 1930s. In August 1938 Adolf Hilter began making speeches that suggested he was going to send the German Army into Czechoslovakia. The British government now began to fear a war with Nazi Germany and Neville chamberlain ordered that Air Raid Precautions (ARP) volunteers to be mobilized

  • Britain's Policy of Evacuating Children

    3023 Words  | 7 Pages

    Britain's Policy of Evacuating Children During the Second World War people’s attitudes and reactions towards evacuation changed. There were both positive and negative experiences for the three main groups I am going to discuss, the evacuated children, their parents and their foster parents. For the children at the beginning of the Second World War, Evacuation was looked upon as one big adventure, and the children treated it rather like a childish game. Their opinions however began to chance

  • Exploring the Different Reactions of People Toward Evacuation

    567 Words  | 2 Pages

    Different Reactions of People Toward Evacuation On the 31st August 1939 1.5 million school children were evacuated to the countryside to be taken in by families across the country. The evacuation took place over the next 3 days and by the end day war was declared. The idea of evacuation was protect and save innocent lives and look after the future of Britain against the new technology. The four groups involved each had very different experiences of evacuation. Many of the evacuees enjoyed the

  • Why Did the British Governent Evacuate Children from Major Cities at the Start of World War II?

    597 Words  | 2 Pages

    Even before War with Germany was accredited, the British government felt that it was necessary to shield the civilian inhabitants, especially children; pregnant mothers, disabled people and teachers accompanied them. The government decided to evacuate children from the major cities into rural areas. They had many reasons for doing this, each of them mainly linked to fear of civilian casualties. As it was the Germans themselves who began civilian bombings, the British government did have reason

  • The British Government's Decision to Evacuate Children from Britain’s Major Cities at the Start of the Second World War

    1769 Words  | 4 Pages

    evacuated children from major cities in Britain to safer areas of the country in response to a new style of warfare that had emerged from World War One, due to the use of aircraft. Aircraft began to target industrial areas in an attempt to damage a country’s economy, and therefore damage their ability on the front line, and morale. However, accuracy was bad and so bombs often landed off target and injured civilians who worked or lived in the industrial areas. The Government decided that the children needed

  • Essay On Operation Pied Piper

    1456 Words  | 3 Pages

    in the UK has changed and we no longer live in fear of being separated from our families. Children live more stable lives and can grow up surrounded by their loved ones, which is what they all deserve. However, this was not the case back in 1939. The evacuation process began on the 1st September 1939 and within just 3 days, 1.5 million children had been sent away to rural locations. Many of the city children were sent off to live completely different lives in the heart of the country in locations

  • Why the British Government Decided to Evacuate Children in the Early Years of the Second World War

    669 Words  | 2 Pages

    Evacuate Children in the Early Years of the Second World War During world war 2 children were evacuated in their thousands from London and other major cities to be dispersed to more secluded rural regions, out of range of German bombers flying from occupied France, or less at risk of attack. For many young evacuees, forced to live for years in some cases with strange people and in unfamiliar places, it was often a traumatic displacement. The policy may have saved many children, but it was

  • Japanese Internment Camps

    1774 Words  | 4 Pages

    through the events mentioned, but also through themes that both accounts share such as adversity, prejudice, and perseverance. The novel's account of the evacuation and imprisonment of Japanese American is a subtle and understated retelling of the horrific experience of the Japanese Americans. While the historical accounts describe the evacuation of Japanese Americans as one of the most horrifying experience anyone could have been through. According to Valerie Matsumoto, author of "Japanese American

  • Operation Pied Piper Essay

    631 Words  | 2 Pages

    people being transported were school children, who were separated from their families and escorted by a small army of guardians (teachers). The impact of the evacuation on the children depended on what social status they were in at the time. Parents who had extensive amounts of money made their own arrangements for their kids. Also, children at private schools, formed in the cities tended to move out to manor homes in the countryside; where they