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Free Employee Theft Essays and Papers

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    Employee Theft

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    Employee Theft The following memorandum written by a director of a security and safety consulting service discusses a critical issue effecting business in our economy today, that of employee theft. "Our research indicated that, over past six years, no incident of employee theft have been reported within ten of the companies that have been our clients. In analyzing the security practices of these ten companies, we have further learned that each of them requires its employees to wear photo identification

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    Prevention of Employee Theft

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    Prevention of Employee Theft Why do employees feel free to steal? Most employee theft occurs because it is too easy. What can a company do to prevent employee theft? What should a company do to employee thieves? The following paragraphs summarize a few ideas. Employee theft is a crime that is costing U.S. companies a great deal of money. Employee thefts are growing in number, partially because the perpetrators really do not see themselves as criminals and rationalize what they are doing

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    Employee Theft in the Restaurant Industry

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    Employee Theft in the Restaurant Industry It has been estimated that about $52 billion a year is lost due to employee theft and that approximately 95% of all businesses experience employee theft. Employee theft amounts to 4 percent of food sales at a cost in excess of $8.5 billion annually, according to the National Restaurant Association (Neighbors 2004.) The small Business Administration indicates that 60 percent of business failures are a result of employee theft. There are several reasons

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    Employee Theft in the Workplace

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    without permission. Theft is the act of stealing and is defined by Ivancevich, Konopake and Matteson as the unauthorized taking, consuming or transfer of money or goods owned by an organization. The purpose of this paper is to explain and discuss employee theft in the workplace. The goal is to provide information concerning the motives, methods and effects of employee theft. Motives for Employees Theft In an effort to discuss meaningfully, the root or underlining reason for employee heft must be understood

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    In recent months, the management team of this organization has been working tirelessly to diminish biases among group members and to establish a proposal focusing on the elimination of in-store employee theft. This criminal activity associated with inventory shrinkage and major revenue loss has proved to be a detriment to our company, but thankfully, is now in the process of being reversed. The success of our proposal resulted from the dynamics of an open discussion format in our group setting and

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    Investigating Theft in Retail Organizations

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    Investigating Theft in Retail Organizations In an industry where a 1% change in gross margin can mean millions of dollars, retailers have begun focusing greater energy on mitigating losses caused by employee theft. Employee theft has become a problem of increasing significance for retail organizations over the past few decades. In 2004, the European Theft Barometer report showed an increasing prevalence of employee theft in retail organizations, up 1% from 2003 (Technology Tackles Employee Theft, 2005)

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    Sometimes there is no middle ground. Monitoring of employees at the workplace, either you side with the employees or you believe management owns the network and should call the shots. The purpose of this paper is to tackle whether monitoring an employee is an invasion of privacy. How new technology has made monitoring of employees by employers possible. The unfairness of computerized monitoring software used to watch employees. The employers desire to ensure that the times they are paying for to

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    Reducing Employee Productivity

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    Reducing Employee Productivity Loss, After Connecting to the Internet Overview Today companies continually search for ways to improve efficiency, and Internet e-mail has helped to achieve this goal. One of the problems not foreseen in connecting the office to the Internet is the millions of Web sites that exist. Making it simple for workers to connect to the Internet allows users to waste time, money, and bandwidth, only to return with virus-laden files as souvenirs of their efforts. This

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    org/discrimination/employment.shtml). Three major factors contribute to being overweight. These factors are hereditary, medication and ethnicity. An obese person may be entitled to claim disability payments from the Social Security Administration. Discrimination against an employee for being overweight would be wrong when the Social Security Administration recognizes obesity as a disability. Adults who qualify for disability claim it for muscle or skeletal complications. Severe obesity inflicts the body with pain and affects

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    Employee Organisations & Unions If employers and employees have a history of good working relationship and mutual trust, reaching decisions, which are fair under the circumstances, would be achievable. For example, if the business is poor and redundancies are possible, it would be impossible to find a solution to suit everyone so the employer would have to make a difficult decision. Good relations between employers and employees are only possible if both feel that they can discuss major

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