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    Cultural Differences in Child Development Expectations ABSTRACT -------- A small research has been carried in order to find out how different cultural backgrounds can influence a child’s developmental expectations in adults and the consequences of these expectations. The design of the method was a replication of Hess et al., 1980, study, applied into two mothers with early age daughters, coming from two different cultural backgrounds, English and Spanish. They answered at what

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    Construction of Love and Gender in Jane Eyre Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte focuses primarily on love, specifically romantic love and it is the way in which Charlotte Bronte challenges 19th century socio-cultural views on gender and romance, as well as other discourses within the novel such as class and status that makes Jane Eyre successful. The main discourse within Jane Eyre that impacts most greatly upon its feature, romantic love, is the societal classes of the time. This upper

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    identity is illustrated through the narrations of seven women. In these stories the women discuss events of their past and the reader is able to see how it affects them later in life. In addition, they also discuss how they have been shaped by cultural expectations. These two things affect both the mothers and daughters in the novel. The best example of how personal history affects the development or loss of an identity is through the stories of Ying-Ying St. Clair. The events in Ying-Ying’s early

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    and she would use it to pay the bills and buy the food.) as well as cleaning the house and the doing the whole family's washing, which all together usually equated to (or more than) full time work. Women were put under heavy strain due to cultural expectations and norms. They were expected to be under their family's beck and call 24 hours a day and while husbands could escape household pressures such as screaming children, by going to the pub with their friends, women could never even dream of that

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    rights of a woman

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    other social sciences. The basic debate in defining gender is at what point is the distinction made between the natural (sex) and the cultural (gender). Gayle Rubin’s definition in “The Traffic in Women: Notes on the ‘Political Economy’ of Sex” is that “sex” is the raw material on which culture uses to produce “gender” and that gender is the cultural expectations of the differences between men and women. The important aspect of the definition of gender is that it is culturally defined and does not

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    profits, and an over all positive environment to conduct business. The Culture: The culture of today is not ripe for change. Individuals, both managers and workers alike are impatient, expecting results over night. These unrealistic cultural expectations make implementing any quality system a challenge in itself. Consumers are tired of false promises and are impatient for immediate results and the best for less. As years pass, generations pass on the wisdom of the previous lessons learned

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    women’s rights grew tiresome after suffrage had been won, women separated in search of their own individuality; however a woman’s identity was based on the sex-role stereotypes advertisements continuously portrayed which in turn transformed cultural expectations and thwarted women’s autonomy. The emergence of consumerism allowed advertisements to be viewed worldwide. "Across the nation, women in cities, towns and farms paged through issues of mass-circulation... ... middle of paper ... ...ture

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    Bread Givers

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    and iron recognizing the fact that she has a strong will. It is Sara’s strong will that causes the most of the conflict with her and her father. Sara gets her strong will and drive from her father. She is not like her sisters who follow the cultural expectations of early marriage, but she, instead, has greater ambition for her life. Sara plans to get an education which is not in her fathers plan for her life. Reb wants Sara to marry like her other sisters, and live a "holy" life according

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    Poking the Parts

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    And one aspect of female sexuality that has had been most intensely labeled is masturbation. So my questions are, what cues are women really picking up about their sexuality? How do women create their own sense of sexuality independent of these cultural norms and dictations? My goals in exploring female masturbation as a symbol of female sexuality and its relationship to women and to society are multi-layered. In this paper, I plan to outline the theoretical history of the taboo on female masturbation

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    Power and Starvation in the Novels and Lives of Emily and Charlotte Bronte In the fictional worlds of Charlotte and Emily Brontë, one of the few ways that women who otherwise have very little say in their lives are able to express dissatisfaction is through self-starvation and illness. It is noteworthy that in their own lives the Bronte sisters exhibited many eccentric habits in regards to eating, and both Charlotte and (especially) Emily engaged in self-starvation similar to the strategies

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    In every society that I know of, there are cultural expectations. Literature tends to follow the same expectations. We have had quite a few stories in this class where we focused on cultural expectations. Rip in "Rip Van Winkle," Editha and George in "Editha and Major Molineux in "My Kinsman, Major Molineux" are all victims of cultural expectations. Let me start with "Rip Van Winkle." This story actually takes place in two different time periods. Before Rip fell asleep, he was living in the

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    Strict Cultural Expectations A parenting style that I will change when raising my own children is not utilizing techniques that have harsh cultural expectations, especially with regards to identity, future careers, and social freedom. That is to say, the South Asian culture prefer not to physically appear in the same way Westerners would. Moreover, my parents constantly encourage me to pursue a career in medicine without considering what I am capable of doing. Also, being a female

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    What you know, you know, what you don't know, you don't know. This is true wisdom.” – Confucius, The Analects, Ch II. References Cortazzi, M. (1990). Cultural and educational expectations in the language classroom. In B. Harrison (Ed.). Culture and the Language Classroom. ELT Documents 132. London: Macmillan. Modern English Publications and the British Council. 54-65. Kaplan, R. D. (2015, February 06). Asia's Rise Is

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    Gender and Cultural Expectations Misogyny is not the result of the physical state of womanhood; it is the product of the conventions that a society has established for how a woman should compose herself (Rey). These societal rules were created with the intent of perpetuating a patriarchal system in which women cannot express themselves freely. Misogyny is an attempt at enforcing these rules, and misogynistic behaviors can be performed by anyone. While The Gender Knot discusses how the limitation

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    Adaptation and Acculturation weighed heavily on my cultural expectations. Belonging to immigrant parents in their notion on child rearing created uncertainty for my “Americanized” views. Belonging to mix ancestry, did not seem to help either. My mother is of East Indian ancestry while my father is of African ancestry. My household was headed by my mother. My father usually worked long hours and was the family’s breadwinner. My mother was a stay at home mom so her child rearing views were particularly

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    American women and men face sort of cultural expectations about how they should speak and behave. While some cultural expectations between females and males are still around outraging this, most expectations are not followed anymore and are rare. Yes women and men pursue cultural expectations, but as time goes by ways of speaking and body language changes. Women did not have a voice back then like men or have any rights that could benefit them. Things have changed so women now could express themselves

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    Cultural Expectations for Women within America Every year about a million immigrants come to America in hope to start a better life for their family. They leave with virtually nothing, just the clothes on their backs and a few, hard earned coins. As they start a new life here in the United States, most immigrants tend to notice the drastic differences that are present between their culture and Western society, particularly in the way women are supposed to talk and behave. In the excerpt from “Memoirs

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    Assisted Suicide

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    Assisted Suicide I examine the ways in which our cultural expectations with respect to death may be transformed by the legalization of assisted suicide. I suggest the inadequacy of the philosophical framework currently taken as the basis for discussing the advantages as well as the dangers of legalizing assisted suicide. I do not believe that individual autonomy is any sort of possibility for dying patients, regardless of the social policies that surround death in a society, insofar as our individual

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    Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist

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    wrath" of the cultural gods as a result. Winterson has used her literary and financial success to secure a life centered around her work and her concerns-- much to the fascination and horror of the British literary establishment and popular press. Winterson challenges the established "rules" of writing, publishing, reviewing--in sum, the cultural expectations for the woman artist in British society--constructing her life in order to argue against, as Woolf does in AROO, two cultural myths: that the

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    playing for. Those others? Bah!,” Chapter 9. This was because while others appreciated her music for entertainment value, Edna was the only one to respect the artistry in the music. This bond through the alienation of others articulates society’s expectation of unification and if one is not unified, they become outcasted-- in an ironic turn of events, those unable to unify with societal standards, such as Mademoiselle Reisz and Enda, eventually formed their own set of standards, resulting in movements

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