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    Coleridge vs. Robinson

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    Coleridge vs. Robinson Both poems make a point to stress loneliness. Robinson’s poem seems to be addressing the reader more in a universal way, which is in keeping with the typical female writer of the time. The characters in Robinson’s poem do not have any names, thus enhancing this universality of the piece. The first line of the poem inserts the reader into the scene without any address or notice, “Upon a lonely beach,” and a theme that exists for both writers becomes apparent—that of loneliness

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    Coleridge Jackson Coleridge Jackson is a narrative poem written by a black American woman named Maya Angelou, she was born on April 4th, 1928 and lived throughout the struggle for black equality, the poem outlines the struggle of a black man who is belittled by his white boss, I think the poem was written to gain support and sympathy for black Americans in their steps for equality. The first line is very powerful, it uses a statement of fact that immediately puts an image of coleridge in the readers

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    are made more precise only through their relationship to one another" (12). Though the argument appears to be circular it would be more accurate to say that it circulates, and thus reflects upon a process of reciprocal exchanges. One might say of Coleridge that his intuition unfolds over thinking, rather than under-standing. The presentational aspect of the work of art works form. Form is never static, it is always forming and being formed ("forma informans"-- shaping form). Imagination takes on

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    Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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    Samuel Taylor Coleridge The French and American Revolutions had an enormous impact on the early Romantic thinkers like Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth. The aristocracies that had been controlling Europe were beginning to fall, the middle class began to grow and power was increasingly falling into the hands of the common people. This may explain why the poetry that Coleridge and Wordsworth produced was aimed at the common man, rather than the educated aristocrats. This meant a

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    Coleridge: Early Visions

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    Coleridge: Early Visions Richard Holmes' intent in his biography on Coleridge is apparent from the opening pages. In fact, even his title implies his purpose of showing Coleridge as a visionary hero. In his preface Holmes clearly spells out his plan for achieving this purpose. He explains that much of the previous work done on Coleridge has focused on the more negative aspects of his life--his "opium addiction, his plagiarisms, his fecklessness in marriage, his political 'apostasy', his sexual

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    Blake Coleridge Swift

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    The Symbolism of Christ William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Jonathan Swift were very different writes but are bound by basic Christian beliefs. In their writings there are strong references to Christ and symbolic images of Him. Blake writes "The Lamb" as a symbolic representative of Christ. Coleridge uses many form of religious symbolism in his poem "The Rhime of the Ancient Mariner", but the thing that stands out the most is how the albatross represents Christ. Swift writes in "Gulliver's

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    crew on his ship because of his killing of a creature which was to bring them the wind that they needed to put power into the sails of the ship. The whole point of the poem is to encourage or convince the reader to believe the tale that Coleridge tells. Coleridge wrote the poem as a means to induce the reader with what he calls a "willing suspension of disbelief." The poem is written in such a way that the reader is expected to willingly decide to temporarily believe the almost unbelievable story

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    The Hard Life of Samuel Coleridge

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    The Hard Life of Samuel Coleridge Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born on October 21, 1772 in Ottery St. Mary, Devonshire. He was the youngest of ten children and was often teased and bullied by the others. When he was 7 years old, Coleridge ran away from home. He was found unharmed the next morning. This event has recurred, in a literary sense, in a large portion of his writings. Many of his poems, sketches, and notebooks contained pictures and descriptions of his night spent outdoors. Although

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    known writers for creating the Romantic Movement was Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He was born on October 21, 1772, in Ottery St. Mary, Devon, England. In 1782 his father died and he was then sent away as a charity student to Christ’s Hospital. At a very young age, Coleridge was always eager to learn, which brought him to becoming a classical scholar. Coleridge soon became a student at Jesus College in 1791. In December of 1793, Coleridge was hounded by debts and decided to enlist in the Light Dragoons

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    ‘The 1800 Preface’ to The Lyrical Ballads explains, amongst other things, the circumstances and mutual agreeability that led Wordsworth and Coleridge to co-author a work representative of their ‘joint opinions on Poetry’ (LB 16). Their kinship was founded by a sense of mutual respect for one another’s ability, having admired each other’s poetry for some time before they met in person, and through a shared similar background of being educated at Cambridge and subsequent sympathies for the radical

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