Free Clytemnestra Essays and Papers

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Free Clytemnestra Essays and Papers

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    The Powerful Clytemnestra in Aeschylus' Oresteia What Price Glory? was the title of a Maxwell Anderson play about World War I. Although the Oresteia deals with the period following a much different war, the same question can be asked of it. In the trilogy Aeschylus presents the reader with a stunning example of ancient Greek society, in which warrior ideals were firmly held, and glory in battle was considered the supreme good. The question of moral justification in the trilogy brings in many

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    Deceitful Clytemnestra of Euripides' Electra

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    Deceitful Clytemnestra of Euripides' Electra Agamemnon returns from Troy, a victorious general, bringing home spoils, riches and fame. He is murdered on the same day as he returns. Clytemnestra, his adulterous wife, has laid in wait for her husband's homecoming and kills him whilst he is being bathed after his long journey. During the Agamemnon, large proportions of the Queen's words are justifications for her action, which is very much concerned with the sacrifice of Iphigenia to the gods,

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    First Impressions of Clytemnestra in Euripides’ Electra The play begins with the dreary-eyed watchman, scared stiff ("old comrade, terror" 17) of the Queen ("that woman - she manoeuvres like a man" 13) and her tyrannical rule. He says that he cries  "for the hard times" that he endures.  We are very sure from what he says that the House of Atreus is in cruel hands and he clamours for the return of his "loving" King. Clytemnestra is never mentioned by name, as the sentry is afraid of punishment

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    Comparing the Portrayal of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon and Electra In both Electra and Agamemnon, Euripides and Aeschylus have chosen to represent Clytemnestra as a complex character being neither all bad nor all good - the signature of a sophisticated playwright. In Agamemnon, Clytemnestra is a morbidly obsessive woman, utterly consumed by the murder of her daughter for which the audience cannot help but sympathise; she is capable only of vengeance. In the Electra, Clytemnestra is placed in an even

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    Agamemnon, the returning war hero, and Clytemnestra, the dutiful spouse. So which of these two, if any, are the play’s tragic hero? In the play Agamemnon, by Aeschylus, Clytemnestra, not Agamemnon, is the play’s tragic hero. Yet before the tragic hero can be established, the tragedy must be established. The situation leading to the first of the Orestia’s plays was most certainly tragic. Helen ran off with Paris, a shift in fortune neither Agamemnon nor Clytemnestra could have changed. A line that had

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    Agamemnon

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    argued that he was good, while others dispute that his motives were wrong. Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife, gained a strong hatred for him, after he sacrificed his own daughter so he could go to war. Many believe that this was not necessary and could have been overcome. The chorus seems to agree with this to an extent, and feels that Agamemnon could have prayed and requested that he not sacrifice his daughter. Clytemnestra, after Agamemnon was at war for a few years, began to cheat on Agamemnon with

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    Justice in the Oresteia

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    to death after death; it also requires someone to kill the murderer and avenge the victim's death. Revenge is often spurred on my loss of a loved one. Clytemnestra is no exception to this rule; she feels that she must avenge the murder of her daughter by killing her husband, Agamemnon. When Agamemnon arrives from conquering Troy, Clytemnestra only wishes that "by all rights our child should be here…/Orestes" (867-868). She flatters him and attacks him through his greatest weakness, his pride

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    Revenge and Violence in Cassandra

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    story of Agamemnon, Clytemnestra and Cassandra after the Trojan war. "Cassandra" is the second part of "Mycenae Lookout" and chronicles Cassandra, Apollo's ill-fated prophetess, who is captured by Agamemnon at the war's end and brought back to Mycenae as a slave. The fates of Cassandra and the House of Atreus collide with Agamemnon's return to Mycenae, where his wife Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus plot his murder.  Aegisthus and Clytemnestra both seek revenge: Clytemnestra for her daughter's

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    Agamemnon

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    Agamemnon was the son of Atreus, the brother of Menelaus and the brother-in-law of Helen; he was told to sacrifice his daughte Agamemnon was the son of Atreus, the brother of Menelaus and the brother-in-law of Helen; he was told to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia to atone for the killing of a deer sacred to Artemis so that the Greek fleet could have wind to sail to Troy. However, Artemis snatched Iphigenia away at the last second and transported her to Tauris (now known as the Crimea) to

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    Agamemnon the chorus fears more the control of an effective woman in Clytemnestra rather than the leadership of fruitless Agamemnon. Both choruses take direct actions thought to ensure their prominence. Agamemnon picks of the story eponymous Greek king following the conclusion of the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Clytemnestra has assumed the throne, and the polis has flourished under her. However, as a woman, Clytemnestra is nonetheless seen as unsuited to continue her reign given the morays

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