Free Chekov Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
Page 1 of 7 - About 63 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Star Trek’s masters used characters like Chekov to ridicule the Soviet Union. Remember his accent? And what about all his claims of Russian cultural superiority? What about the fact that he would say—straight faced—that the Russians invented the phone, that Shakespeare was Russian, and that Russia was the source of all culture, while Kirk (and his audience) knew that all the things Chekov claimed as Russian were part of our dominant West; knew that Chekov, and by extension Russia, was one big joke

    • 1345 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    A Theater of My Own

    • 978 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Strindberg's Motherlove. I played the mother. We explored the work in class and interpreted it aloud in rehearsal after school. We wrote papers and memorized text, learning the language of our character. In her classroom and on her stage, we played Chekov, Wilde, Coward, O'Casey and Shakespeare. Just as my grandmother revealed to me the drama of theater, Mrs. Doyle introduced me to its literature. During my sophomore year, I acted in Ionesco's The Bald Soprano. After I read it in French as La Cantatrice

    • 978 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Anton Chekhov Biography

    • 1394 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Anton Chekhov, was the exception. Though he lived to be a figure of prestige and wealth, well among the few, fortunate and hated Russian beorgousie, Chekov possessed a background of humble origins. It was for this reason that the legacy of Chekov was fully annexed into the new age of Russian culture as it did so flourish in the age before. Anton Chekov was born in 1860 , the third among six children to a lower middle-class family. But his lineage was connected to origins of even greater obscurity

    • 1394 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    The Reinvention of King Lear

    • 2079 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    The Tempest reworked as children's theatre (The Island of Anyplace), this production is, more often than not, a new interpretation of the ancient text. While the average audience member may never have heard of modern masters like Albee, Beckett, or Chekov, no matter their station in life or how far away that we get from the Elizabethan era, they have heard of William Shakespeare. Moreover, there are theatre practitioners who dedicate the entirety of their careers to the performing or directing of his

    • 2079 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    School Violence

    • 973 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Even though we live in a capitalist society, I still cannot help but believe, despite my own cynicism, that people are more motivated to achieve something for personal satisfaction rather than monetary gains. Look at Chekov's short story, "The Bet." A man agrees to sacrifice fifteen years of his life in prison in exchange for a million dollars. Obviously his motivation for such an extreme bet is wealth, but by the end of the prison sentence, the man could care less about the money. After years of

    • 973 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Comedy and Tragedy in The Cherry Orchard

    • 1537 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    Comedy and Tragedy in The Cherry Orchard Anton Chekov's The Cherry Orchard serves as a glimpse into the lives of upper middle-class Russians at the turn of the century. The play at times seems to be a regretful account of past mistakes, but at other times it seems very comedic. The final outcome tends to classify it primarily as a tragedy with no shortage of lighthearted moments. It invokes many feelings within the reader: joy, regret, pity, and anger are all expressed among the interactions

    • 1537 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    the male spouse for identity. For a woman to become a "wife" was a defining role in women's lives back then, especially within the eastern European cultures. Sadly, marriage is not always shown to be flowery and romantic as expected. Although Anton Chekov portrays his protagonist character Olga as kind hearted and attractive and favored, she often longs for “love” from the male gender, and serves as the embodiment of female disempowerment. From Olga’s perspective as the story is told, “she cannot exist

    • 998 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    This essay will address the apparent dissatisfaction with the concept of love, which is expressed by one of the play’s principal characters Peter Trofimov. As a student and former tutor in the Ranevsky household, Peter represents the Realist scholar as well as the working class, and voices the ideals and sentiments of both. In response to the negative social changes caused by the rising middle class, the working class had grown skeptical of the concepts of love and freedom, because such concepts

    • 736 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    audience on how to solve their own problem. Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekov both provide unique analysis on issues their culture never thought as wrong. In the play A Doll's House Ibsen tackles women's rights as a matter of importance being neglected. In his play he acknowledges the fact that in nineteenth century European life the role of the women was to stay home, raise the children, and attend to her husband. Chekov illustrates the role of a dysfunctional family and how its members are effected

    • 1624 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    to laugh at the characters because all of their hard work and troubles were for nothing; Mathilde lost her youth and beauty for a fake necklace; Vanka wasted his hopes on a letter that will never arrive at its destination. Works Cited Chekov, Anton. "Vanka." Understanding Fiction. 3rd ed. Eds. Clanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hill, 1979. 46-49 de Maupassant, Guy. "The Necklace." Understanding Fiction. 3rd ed. Eds. Clanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren

    • 791 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
Previous
Page1234567