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Free Causal Essays and Papers

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    Descartes’ Special Causal Principle

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    Descartes’ Special Causal Principle In his Meditations, Rene Descartes attempts to uncover certain truths about existence.  In his Third Meditation, he establishes his "special causal principle" (SCP).  Descartes uses this principle to explore the origin of ideas, and to prove the existence of God.  I agree that there is much logic to be found in the SCP, but I disagree with Descartes method of proving God's existence, and in this essay I will explain why.  I will begin by explaining the SCP

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    Erin's Causal Argument

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    Erin's Causal Argument "Nothing meant more to people who went West in the 1840's and 1850's than mail from home." - National Park Service Pony Express Historic Trail Brochure People moved West for many reasons: the prospect of a new beginning, free land, even Gold! Leaving family behind was a hardship that many settlers dealt with. And at this time, the only way to communicate with those left behind was to write letters. Moving was, and still is, a very traumatic process. Picking up and

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    Natural Necessity, Objective Chances and Causal Powers ABSTRACT: Are the relations between the property of a thing and its related disposition to react in certain ways, and between the triggering of that disposition and the consequent effect, necessary? Harré and Madden, in their analysis of causal powers, said they are, but their arguments are not persuasive. Humeans like Simon Blackburn deny it. I criticize the Humean position, and argue afresh for their necessity. I note that David Lewis'

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    Causal Argument: Why Do People Change The Way They Look? Oscar Wilde once wrote: “It is only shallow people who judge by appearance. The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible” (qtd in Davis 1). Obviously, humans have all been created differently. That is why we all do not look alike. But now, the idea of having the ideal shape and look is one of the issues everyone has to deal with. Some want to get thinner, while a few do not care about it. Others even change the color

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    Causation and Moral Responsibility for Death

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    causation of death. However, a number of causal factors come into play in any death; it is impossible to state a complete cause of death. I argue that John Mackie’s analysis of causation in terms of ‘inus factors,’ insufficient but non-redundant parts of unnecessary but sufficient conditions, helps us to see that moral responsibility for death cannot rest on causation alone. In specifying the cause of death, some factors can be considered alternatively as either causal factors or merely parts of the presupposed

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    theory and theory theory is the assumption that folk psychological explanations of behavior are causal. Simulationists Martin Davies, Tony Stone, and Jane Heal claim that folk psychological explanations are explanations that make sense of another person by citing the thoughts important to the determination of his behavior on a given occasion. I argue that it is unlikely these explanations will be causal. Davis et al. base their claim on the assumption that a certain isomorphism obtains between the

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    The Ultimate of Reality: Reversible Causality

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    search for an ultimate principle by which all real things and relations are ordered. It formulates fundamental statements about existence and change. A reversible (absolute) causality is thought to be the ultimate of reality. It is argued that a real (causal) process relating changes of any nature (physical, mental) and any sort (quantitative, qualitative, and substantial) reverses the order of its agency (action, influence, operation, producing): real causation must run in the opposite direction, or

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    Descartes' Method of Doubt

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    Descartes' Method of Doubt In this essay I will assess Descartes's employment of his Method of Doubt, as presented in his Meditations on the First Philosophy [Descartes 1641]. I will argue that by implicitly accepting a causal model of perception, Descartes did not apply the Method of Doubt as fully as he could have. The Method of Doubt Descartes's principal task in the Meditations was to devise a system that would bring him to the truth. He wanted to build a foundational philosophy; a

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    despite the unmistakable testimony of his sense to the contrary. Having once sinned, he thereupon lost his psychophysical privilege. Whereas pre-lapsarian physiology made Adam's belief in the causal efficacy of God possible, post-lapsarian physiology, in contrast, necessarily engenders and sustains belief in the causal efficacy of bodies. It was only as a result of the post-lapsarian physiology that some of the central problems of early modern philosophy arose. Contingent upon Adam's psychophysical privilege

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    "eternal, infinite, omniscient, omnipotent, and the Creator of all things that exist apart from him." This is the first premise of the argument (of course, this has not yet shown that anything corresponding to the idea exists). Secondly, there is the "Causal Adequacy Principle." This principle implies that any object must have as its cause something that contains at least all the attributes of the object if not more. Descartes offers the example of a stone, saying that it cannot be produced by anything

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