Free Blue Velvet Essays and Papers

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Free Blue Velvet Essays and Papers

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    Blue Velvet was first released in 1986 and became a huge contreversy internationally. It was deemed as pornography and was at the centre of a national firestorm, yet years later, the film is widley regarded to be an American classic, one of the greatest cinematic achievements. The themes in the film are rich and complex. Blue Velvet introduced several common elements of Lynch's work, including distorted characters, a polarized world, debilitating damage to the skull or brain and the dark underbelly

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    David Lynch's Blue Velvet is an exploration of things above and below the surface. This surface is really a borderline between not only idyllic suburban America and the dark, perverted corruption that lies underneath but also between good and evil, conscious and subconscious, dream and reality. Although this division seems quite rigid and clean-cut some of the most important implications of the film stem from the transgressions of these borderlines. In the initial scenes of the film Lynch introduces

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    Contrasting Themes in “Blue Velvet” The subconscious psyche is one of the most fascinating and almost completely inexplicable aspects of human behavior. Even more intriguing than merely the subconscious is the notion of a darker, more repressed side that many individuals refuse to acknowledge exists within them. In David Lynch’s film “Blue Velvet,” the director attempts to explore the psyche of a young man named Jeffrey Beaumont, most notably the clash between his darker side and “good” side

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    Blue Velvet: Scene Analysis The opening scene in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet portrays the theme of the entire film. During this sequence he uses a pattern of showing the audience pleasant images, and then disturbing images to contrast the two. The first shot of the roses over the picket fence and the title track “Blue Velvet” establishes the setting (Lumberton) as a typical suburban town. The camera starts on a bright blue sky with birds chirping and flying by and then tilts down to bright red

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    David Mamet's The House of Games and David Lynch's Blue Velvet Have you ever wondered what it would be like to control another person's mind? The mere capabilities of someone possessing this powerful of an influence on others has a twisted and very horrifying , yet interesting sense of bewildering control and has boggled the minds of many for centuries. There have been several instances of historical examples in which a person in power somehow persuades the people under them to surrender their

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    Portrait of a Cartographer Someone must decide how to color maps. Where to put the pale yellow, coral pink, the olive green, burnt orange, magenta. Where to put the darkest shades of blue. The lightest. There is something of symmetry, of composition. There is topography to consider. Demographics. The vast expanse of open land, open water, the sensuous curves of coastline, of mountain ranges, of rivers with their writhing bodies and forked tongues. The color of the ocean is according to its depth

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    Mulholland Drive

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    The 2001 film Mulholland Drive directed by David Lynch is as thrilling as it is confusing to some people. As I watched it for the first time, I couldn't help but wonder the point that Lynch was trying to make was. To me, there was a comprehensible meaning to the story and it mainly involves the character Betty. Although, I later found out Betty was someone entirely different, Diane. Betty being a dream of Diane's is at the root of the story I believe Lynch was trying to tell. I see this film as a

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    Movie Analyses

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    that suits the movie. There are many qualities to judge a movie by, but it is best to find qualities that certain movies share in common to best judge the two. The three movies being compared and contrasted in this paper are The House of Games, Blue Velvet, and The Unbearable Lightness of Being. To best analyze these movies, they will be looked at from three viewpoints: their use of both physical and emotional relationships, their use of surrealism, and their use of art and music. Before one can learn

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    A strange, a wonderfully twisted film, the 1986 feature Blue Velvet, can be seen as one of David Lynch’s more grounded film’s in regards to it’s narrative focus and general veering away from his usual surrealist style features; such as his previous efforts given his breakout film Eraser Head (1977), and his many experimental short’s that laid way to that. His presentation of charters in all of his features ranges from gravely monstrous distortions of individuals. Citing, for example, that of the

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    Love Potiphar’s wife as seen through the eyes of Guido Reni comes to life with her soft looking skin and tender face as she stares longingly up at Joseph. Then her figure falls back into the painting as her pale flesh tones coupled with swirling velvet garments around her body create a surreal setting. She is at once real and unreal. Her features are relaxed, but her intentions are aggressive. Potiphar’s wife embodies the mystery Reni saw in women, capable of being at once threatening and innocent

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