Free Apollonian and Dionysian Essays and Papers

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    The Apollonian and Dionysian man complete each other in the sense that these two terms create our society. The Apollonian man was given its name from Apollo, the sun- god. He represents light, clarity, and form. The Dionysian man was given its name from the Greek god Dionysus. As the wine-god, he represents drunkenness and ecstasy. The Dionysian was the primal aspect of reality, as well as raw nature, life and death, pleasure and pain, desire, passion, sex, and aggression. It is the source of

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    If existence is inherently filled with suffering, what follows? For Schopenhauer, what follows is a life not worth living. Nietzsche disagrees. Although Nietzsche accepts that life is suffering, he does not accept Schopenhauer’s nihilistic conclusion. In The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche attempts to overcome Schopenhauer’s nihilism by appealing to the ancient Greeks. But before explaining the Greek’s response to the suffering, it is important to further explain Schopenhauer’s response. Schopenhauer

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    More specifically, Apollonian art forms tells stories through images and are rooted in dreaming. Much like dreams, apollonian art encourages one to continue living. While contemplating apollonian images, an individual is temporarily detached from her normal sense of self and daily struggle. Here, Nietzsche once again references ancient Greece. The Iliad and

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    the means by which one receives the salvation of Christ, as a psychological journey into the "hell (or evil) of the self" (Soler). Goodman Brown fails to complete his process of individuation because he cannot come to terms with the dual Apollonian and Dionysian nature of his being. The Puritans believed that to be justified, one must let go of his worldly dependence and strive to live a life free of sin (Soler), making the story an allegory “in its treatment of the nature and consequences of

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    Thomas Mann alludes to Greek mythology throughout his novella Death in Venice. One of the Greek mythological themes alluded to in Death in Venice is the struggle known as Apollonian vs. Dionysion. Thomas Mann was strongly influenced by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and his teachings on the Apollonian vs. Dionysion struggle. According to Nietzsche’s teachings every individual contains characteristics from both Greek gods and the two are forever in an internal struggle to dominate said individual’s

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    Nietzsche’s early work On the Birth of Tragedy put forth the Apollonian and Dionysian concepts. Within the work, the German philologist and philosopher states “The effect aroused by the Dionysian also seemed ‘Titanic’ and ‘barbaric’ to the Apollonian Greek: while he was at the same time unable to conceal from himself the fact that he was inwardly related to those fallen Titans and heroes.” Nietzsche goes on further “Indeed, he was obliged to sense something even greater than this: his whole existence

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    that the art capable of ending suffering is tragedy, which is a fusion of the Apollonian and the Dionysian. Nietzsche introduces the Apollonian and the Dionysian as being part of the “Greek Life.” The Apollonian was based off of the Greek god Apollo. It represented culture, order, and art. The Dionysian was based off of the Greek god Dionysus. It represented nature, chaos, and feeling. Both the Apollonian and the Dionysian were combined with the creation of tragedy and became the core o... ... middle

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    Philosophy and the Arts

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    similar characteristics in the way they view the world. There are many similarities and differences found between the experience of the sublime according to Kant in The Critique of Judgment - The Analytic of the Sublime to Nietzsche’s account of the Dionysian dimension of art in The Birth of Tragedy. Immanuel Kant wrote many major works of literature that have influenced other great philosophers of our time. One of those includes The Critique of Judgment - The Analytic of the Sublime where Kant goes into

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    Falling To Eternity

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    The Apollonian and Dionysian duality argued by Nietzsche requires so perfect a balance that the slightest change in consciousness can tip the scales and result in turmoil. Ibsen, in Hedda Gabler, and Hughes, through his poem “How To Paint A Water Lily”, suggest that civilizations rise with Apollonian ideas, but eventually fall due to the overwhelming influences of Dionysian decadence. Ibsen implies that through one’s martyrdom, true freedom and change can be attained, while Hughes implies that culture

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    A Fantasy Come True

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    beads of molten metal” to demonstrate that beauty may come from violence. The growth of the water lily is a natural event that contains the magnificent and turmoil of nature. Hughes wants to reader to comprehend that the balance of the apollonian and the Dionysian is a uncontrollable circumstance. Although these authors don’t concur on the views of society, it is true that fantasy for men will always exist as an optional escape of the reality of the complex and crude world. There needs to be an

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    involves the two most basic parts of society, the artistic Dionysian and the intelligent Apollonian. Sometimes one being becomes more dominant than the other or they both share the same plane. Even though individually created, these theories could be intertwined, even used together. Thus it is the object of this paper to prove that the Freudian theory about the unconscious id, and ego are analogous to the idea on the Apollonian and Dionysian duality's presented by Nietzsche. "The division of the psychical

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    Euripides Support of Women’s Rights

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    To begin to understand what Euripides was doing, it is best to understand the medium of his art: the Greek theater.  Theater was a competitive art among playwrights, with several competitions throughout the year, the greatest of which was at the Dionysian festivals in the spring.  Greek drama, tragedy in particular, had little in common with modern acting productions.  There was little or no suspense as to the outcome of the play; most all were based on Homeric tales from The Iliad and The Odyssey

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    certain way; to understand the concept of how different philosophies, religions, literature, art, and music influence that. Through the study of philosophy, there are two types of thinking that can alter the way one pursues a decision; Apollonian and Dionysian. Apollonian is a

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    nightfall a shocked and respectful world received the news of his decease." (Mann, 73) Aschenbach has earned his place in history as an artist. But like all artists, he is replaced by his successors. Aschenbach's transition from an Apollonian way of life to a Dionysian one shows that art reflects life. In his case, art is nothing more than a reflection, and although beautiful and appreciated, it is not an essential element of life itself. Works Cited "Mann, Thomas." Microsoft(r) Encarta(r)

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    With the advent of film and the ability to produce visual representation of fictional (or non-fictional) characters, situations, and settings, one of the natural courses has been to adapt literary works to the new medium. Throughout time we have seen this occur endlessly, with subjectively varying results. Literature has been adapted to forms such as staged plays, live readings, as well as other visual forms, such as painting, sculpture, or photography, and in each adaption to a new medium, aspects

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    Groundhog Day

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    to the audience. The Groundhog Day explores the primordial question on Nietzsche’s key philosophy of eternal recurrence by using ordinary character in the narrative. In Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche argues that the Greek tragedy was born when the Dionysian worldview

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    [N]ature is a festering hornet's nest of aggression and overkill. (Paglia p.28) In a patriarchal and capitalist society grounded in the rape of the land, it is crucial that men should be able to tame both the female body and nature. This most often takes the forms of covert control, naturalizing the imperatives of the patriarchy into the whole of social interaction on one level, and the exploitation and gradual poisoning of the earth on another. But there are examples of overt control, too, in

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    character, Gustave Von Aschenbach, illustrates the concept of an Apollinian/Dionysian continuum. Apollo is the Greek god of art, thus something Apollinian places an emphasis on form. Dionysus is the Greek god of wine and chaos, hence something Dionysian emphasizes energy and emotion. In The Birth of Tragedy Friedrich Nietzsche suggests that,"... the continuous development of art is bound up with the Apollinian and Dionysian duality--just as procreation depends on the duality of the sexes, involving

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    question I shall therefore firstly have to examine the character of Aschenbach and the development/changes that occur within this character throughout the story. I shall do this by referencing Ashenbach's character development from the Apolline to the Dionysian. After tracing this development we shall then have a clear starting point for examining the ideas played out through the protagonist and we shall be able to examine these ideas closely. This shall involve an assessment of Aschenbach's belief in

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    Dichotomy In Zorba

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    dramatizes the significance of balance between the Apollonian and Dionysian dichotomy, through the characterization of the contrasting protagonists, Boss and Zorba. Kazantzakis typifies the differences amid the philosophical ideologies through the comparison of Boss and Zorba’s beliefs. Moreover, he represents Boss by his willingness to try to improve oneself and live more like Zorba. Through the progression of their journey, Zorba’s Dionysian lifestyle becomes a primary influence to Boss and begins

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