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    Anna Karenina

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    most importantly, emotion can alter one’s perception of a person. Perception can also be influenced by how someone wants to appear and in fact, everyone consciously acts to present a certain image. This is especially true and perhaps mocked in Anna Karenina, where appearance and reality are related much like the sides of a die –– each side is independent of the others, and yet without each side the reality of the die is not complete. As multi-faced characters, Kitty and Levin present an interesting

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    Anna Karenina

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    clearly in the Leo Tolstoy’s novel, Anna Karenina. Infidelity is most evident in the marriage of Anna Karenina and Alexei Karenin and the marriage of Stephen Oblonsky (Stiva) and Darya Oblonskaya (Dolly). The two relationships undergo similar hardships since they both involve a partner that commits adultery. Anna is unfaithful to her husband Alexei, and Stiva is unfaithful to his wife Dolly. Despite the similarity of events, society reacts differently toward Anna committing adultery and Stiva committing

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    Tolstoy's Anna Karenina

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    Tolstoy's Anna Karenina The world of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow's Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and forced into action against their will by coincidence and, sometimes, misfortune. That Anna and Vronsky ever meet and begin the fateful affair

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    Anna Karenina

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    In Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy presents marriage in a realistic sense, marriage is not an easy institution; couples must work through the rough patches in order for it to be strong; he also presents passion as a force that can have a positive influence, but simultaneously presents passion as a factor that can have a corrupting power on a person’s life. These two couples, Levin and Kitty and Vronsky and Anna, are compared throughout the course of the novel. Levin and Kitty differ from Anna and Vronsky

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    Leo Tolstoy, author of Anna Karenina, was born in 1828 in Yasnaya Polyana. He was born into a wealthy Russian family. Tolstoy’s mother passed away when he was two years old and his father was murdered when he was nine. Due to being orphaned at such a young age, Tolstoy was very familiar with the concept of death and he makes this evident throughout all of his great works. Specifically in Anna Karenina, he symbolizes the power of death and mortality through Anna. Tolstoy was unsatisfied with his education

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    Tolstoy's Anna Karenina

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    Tolstoy's Anna Karenina By examining the character list, one immediately notices the value Tolstoy places on character. With one hundred and forty named characters and several other unnamed characters, Tolstoy places his central focus in Anna Karenina on the characters. He uses their actions and behavior to develop the plot and exemplify the major themes of the novel. In contrast to Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Tolstoy wishes to examine life as it really is. Both novels have relationships

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    Anna Karenina Themes

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    Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina is a novel established on the themes of love and marriage in a nineteenth century aristocratic Russian society where both major and minor characters play an important role in surfacing the main motifs that Tolstoy wishes to expose in the book. Fulfilment and satisfaction from love and life is one of the chief themes of the book that Tolstoy represented through his characters Anna Karenina and Konstantin Dmitrich Levin. Throughout the book both Anna and Levin experience

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    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy is a novel about love and marriage among the Russian aristocracy in the 1870s. Anna is young, beautiful woman married to a powerful government minister, Karenin. She falls in love with the elegant Count Vronsky and after becoming pregnant by him, leaves her husband Karenin and her son Seryozha to live with her lover. Despite the intervention of friends such as her brother Oblonsky, an adulterer himself, she is unable to obtain a divorce, and lives isolated from the society

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    Passion In Anna Karenina

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    in the relationship of the two main couples in Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. Through the psychology articles and Tolstoy’s specific diction in Anna Karenina, it is easy to see the power of passion in a relationship, even if it is revitalizing passion, will result in suffering and pain without the vital aspects of communication and understanding, which breeds a stable relationship for growing as a couple. The differences in the relationship between Anna and Vronsky and Levin and Kitty are more than

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    The problem of free will is clearly woven into the narrative of the novel Anna Karenina. The author writes about man's free will as the pledge of his constant moral perfection. The moments of freedom that the characters are experiencing, although tiny, are very detailed. Tolstoy concentrates on the characters’ consciousness and the events around them at these moments of freedom and their complex connection of free impulses and needs. Thus, the psychological state of the novel's characters is inevitably

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