Free Alexander Ii Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Better Essays

    Biography of Alexander II

    • 1063 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    Alexander II was the oldest son of his father Emperor Nicholas I. Alexander II was born in Moscow, Russia on April 29, 1818 and died on March 13, 1881. From a young age, Alexander was being prepared for when he becomes emperor. Alexander had a private teacher by the name of Vasili Zhukovski, a famous Russian poet. Alexander learned how to speak four new languages other than Russian. Alexander gained a lot of knowledge through a broad and thorough education; he also worked in rigorous military training

    • 1063 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Alexander II

    • 651 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    Alexander II has been considered “a great historical figure without being a great man, that what he did was more important than what he was.” ( W.E Mosse) For 26 years, Czar Alexander II ruled russia. During his reign, he made his mark on history by stepping outside of the box and going to extreme measures to help his people. He has been labeled as the “Liberator of tsar” for the ending of serfdom. Czar Alexander II of Russia has made an impact on history because of his interesting background

    • 651 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Alexander II Dbq

    • 714 Words
    • 2 Pages

    hard loss during the Crimean War, the previous Czar Nicholas I position was taken over by his son Alexander II. This brought new change and hope to the people of Russia. Russians were hoping for change at the time, and that is exactly what the driven new Czar had brought to the table. Alexander II came along with the idea of modernization and social change for Russia. In order to do this, Alexander II created his reforms which he thought would be Russia's best interest in order to compete with other

    • 714 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Alexander II, at the age of thirty-six, succeeded to power in 1855, after his father Nicholas I passed. As Alexander grew up, he studied and demonstrated a sense of intelligence and humanity. Despite his father and his quite domineering attitude under which Alexander was put, he managed to develop his own opinions and feelings toward what type of government he would provide for his people. Alexander came to power not only during the Crimean War and its aftermath, which ended in loss, but during a

    • 1790 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Intentions of Alexander II and the Failure of the Emancipation of the Serfs In the 19th century it was estimated that about 50 per cent of the 40,000,000 peasants in Russia were serfs, who worked on the land and were owned by the Russian nobility, the Tsar and religious foundations. This had been true for centuries; in 1861, however, this was all changed when Tsar Alexander II emancipated the serfs and gave them freedom from ownership. Alexander's decision was based on many reasons, and

    • 1481 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The More Autocratic Tsar out of Alexander III and Nicholas II Pobedonostsev, who instilled in them strong beliefs in autocracy and nationalism, which were reflected throughout their reign, tutored both Tsars'. When comparing the two Tsars', the impact on the political and social system is significant and hints at which Tsar was more autocratic. Alexander and Nicholas were both autocratic politically, but Alexander was keener to uphold Autocracy. This involved setting up the Okhrana, as

    • 548 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Alexander II as Tsar Liberator When Alexander the second came to power in 1855, he inherited many of the problems that augmented from his previous predecessor, Nicholas the first. This led the tsar to undertake a series of great reforms, which gave him the charming title of “Liberator”. However, were his motives clearly to bring change and a better Russia or were there other motives? Did he expect something in return? After all, for the sake of autocracy he couldn’t just welcome liberation

    • 509 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    urbanization, whose tsar had absolute power. Serfs, peasants who were bound to landowners and had no political rights, comprised the vast majority of the population. Tsar Alexander II (1855-1881) initiated an Age of Reform that he hoped would modernize Russia while maintaining the absolute power of the tsar. In 1861 Alexander II emancipated the serfs, on the grounds that “it is better to abolish serfdom from above than to wait until the serfs begin to liberate themselves from below.” This act put

    • 1706 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Revo Of 1905

    • 2349 Words
    • 5 Pages

    people seemed to be as immovable as the dark ground which they farmed, welded to the ground by centuries of struggle. While the Europeans fought political battles, the Russians wrestled against the cold and starvation. Four decades earlier, Czar Alexander II signed the ``Emancipation Manifesto'' which freed the serfs from ownership by the nobles.1 He had hoped to finally bring Russia out of the dark ages. His bureaucracy continued to elevate the peasants by making all classes of society equal under

    • 2349 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Investigation of the Effect of the Policies of Alexander II in Russia Alexander 11 was the son of Nicholas 1. Alexander came to the thrown in 1856. Alexander’s reforms were unfair to many especially the peasants. However, they were a step forward for Russia as a whole. The emancipation of the serfs was introduced in 1860. This affected the serfs immensely. The serfs now became peasants and were each given land, which also gave some peasants opportunities to become Kulaks. However, it

    • 970 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    economy in the Russia of the 1840s,"1 kept his hand to the pulse of Russia's intelligentsia. Dostoevsky's preoccupation with that same question is understandable given the exigencies of Russian life in his time. When, in l861, the "Tsar-Emancipator," Alexander II, liberated the serfs, pent-up forces for social change were unleashed. In Dostoevsky: The Stir of Liberation; 1860-65, 2 Joseph Frank notes: All the ideals on which previous Russian life had been founded were called into question; influential

    • 3894 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Ems Ukase

    • 823 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    Ukraine 2001). By 1875, a commission was organized to investigate “Ukrainophile propaganda in the southern areas of Russia” (Encylopedia of Ukraine 2001). As a result of this investigation, a “secret decree written on May 30, 1876 by Russian tsar Alexander II” was written called the Ems Ukase (Encylopedia of Ukraine 2001). “The Ems Ukase was issued in response to the growing Ukrainian nationalism movement and the unrest of Ukrainian Cossacks” (Nationamaster 2003). Issued in the town of Ems, Germany

    • 823 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Alexander II's Title as Tsar Liberator Amid the Crimean War克里米亞戰爭 of 1854-56, Alexander II阿歷山大二世 succeededç¹¼ä½ to the throneçš‡ä½ of the Romanov Dynastyç¾…æ›¼è«¾å¤«çš‡æœ of Czarist Russia. Russia was finally defeated. He saw hopes of Russia's recovery in reforms. During his reign在ä½æœŸé–“ in 1855-81, Alexander II carried out a broad reform programme, covering the Emancipation of Serfs解放農奴, establishment of zemstva地方議會, judicialå¸æ³•, educational

    • 1146 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Russia, their system of government was wrong and things had to change. Serfs or peasants shouldn’t need to look elsewhere to making living after emancipation. Alexander II created zemstvos; responsible for road repairs schools and agriculture also introduced great legal reforms, but his ideas didn’t made him popular or influenced anyone.

    • 636 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Russian Reforms Essay

    • 1556 Words
    • 4 Pages

    successful reform, while Alexander II’s is an example of failed reform. The success of Peter’s reforms led to Russia’s rise as an imperial power, and player on the international stage, especially in Eastern Europe. On the other hand, the failure of Alexander II’s reforms eventually led to Tsarist Russia’s collapse, and the rise of the Soviet Union. Clearly, Russian reforms had an impact on world history, and must be studied as a result. This paper will seek to explain why Alexander II’s reforms failed

    • 1556 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    Alexander II was the Tsar Liberator who, despite unflattering characterization by his contemporaries, undertook one of the biggest reforms in Russian history: the liberation of the serfs. Yet despite such a necessary and seemingly humanitarian reform, his life was abruptly finished by a successful terrorist attack following no fewer than ten unsuccessful ones. The main challenge Alexander II faced in his projects towards modernization of Russia was a compromise between advancing his state thorough

    • 3275 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 9 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Describing Tsar King Alexander II's Time in Power To a certain extent, Tsar King Alexander II was a false liberator, however from closer examination, it is not clear cut and there are strong arguments to suggest the contrary. The reasons for the view that Alexander was a false liberator are that firstly, the Crimean war saw Britain, France and Turkey dealt an unexpected and resounding defeat to Russia, who until then was regarded as a superpower. This therefore made change and reform inevitable

    • 1151 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The first step toward modernization was the emancipation of serfdom. Soon after the war end Nicholas I came to end of his life. Alexander II was on the throne and the Great Reform period of Russia began. He first issued the emancipation manifesto in 1861. Alexander II “took steps to improve the condition of the peasantry. But these steps were only partly successful, depending as they did on the goodwill and voluntary action of landlords (Cracraft

    • 928 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Brief Look at Late Tsarist Russia

    • 979 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    “unacceptable” ideologies. It was later in the decade that Russia realized that serfdom was responsible for its civil disorders, industrial poverty, overpopulation, food inadequacy, and military incompetence. It was for these reasons that tsar Alexander II called to an abolishment of the act as a means of strengthening Russia. This was, for instance pushed by the need to have a stronger and larger army to fight in the Crimean War unlike the previous one which only had serfs as military men . As

    • 979 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    English Essay

    • 1126 Words
    • 3 Pages

    conditions of the setting, was very chaotic and was in turmoil. Crime and Punishment took place in Russia, where Russia during the time Crime and Punishment was written was suffering due to economical downfalls and failure of the poor reforms of Tsar Alexander II; ultimately transforming Russia into a poverty-stricken country. The failure of Alexander’s reforms affected much of setting in which Crime and Punishment was written in, which ultimately contributed in character development of Raskolinokov. This

    • 1126 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays