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    "Why the Farmers Were Wrong" The period between 1880 and 1900 was a boom time for American politics. The country was for once free of the threat of war, and many of its citizens were living comfortably. However, as these two decades went by, the American farmer found it harder and harder to live comfortably. Crops such as cotton and wheat, once the bulwark of agriculture, were selling at prices so low that it was nearly impossible for farmers to make a profit off them. Furthermore, improvement in

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    Most of the reasons concerning agrarian discontent in the late nineteenth century stem from supposed threats posed by monopolies and trusts, railroads, money shortages and the demonetization of silver, though in many cases their complaints were not valid. The American farmer at this time already had his fair share of problems, perhaps even perceived as unfair in regards to the success industrialized businessmen were experiencing. Nevertheless, crops such as cotton and wheat, which were once the

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    Agrarian Discontent in Late Nineteenth Century At the end of the nineteenth century the American farmers faced many problems. Industrialization of the farms caused many farm workers to loose their jobs. Many farmers began raising only one crop in large amounts, which led to deflation. This meant ruin for many farmers, since they had to pay back the debts they owed for land and machinery. The railroads, corporations and processors made the situation even worse by organizing together and regulating

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    Agrarian Discontent 1880 to 1900 The period between 1880 and 1900 was a boom time for American Politics. The country was finally free of the threat of war, and many of its citizens were living comfortably. However, as these two decades went by, the American farmer found it harder and harder to live comfortably. Crops such as cotton and wheat, once the sustenance of the agriculture industry, were selling at prices so low that it was nearly impossible for farmers to make a profit off them. Furthermore

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    farmers’ disconnection from the Boston government rendered the situation more volatile than anywhere else. “Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont instituted harsh laws to stem the growth of insurrection. But inland Massachusetts was so heavily agrarian that the rebellion gathered steam.”[2] Backcountry farmers banded together in mobs of up to one thousand men and marched to different cities, rioting in front of prominent shops and courthouses in order to make their frustrations heard. The rebellion

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    spiritual love, denouncing violence.  However, it was the Doukhobors denial of the church, and more importantly the state, to have any authority over their lives that brought them into much conflict with the government.  As the sect developed into agrarian communal societies and engaged in endogamy, its introversion was seen as resistance to the state.  The Doukhobors were thus oppressed in Russia and even after migrating to Canada they failed ... ... middle of paper ... ... to comply with the

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    Shays Rebellion

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    Troubled Farmers “In the first years of peacetime, following the Revolutionary War, the future of both the agrarian and commercial society appeared threatened by a strangling chain of debt which aggravated the depressed economy of the postwar years”.1 This poor economy affected almost everyone in New England especially the farmers. For years these farmers, or yeomen as they were commonly called, had been used to growing just enough for what they needed and grew little in surplus. As one farmer explained

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    Jay Gatsby is a pathetic character because he wasted his whole life chasing an unrealistic dream. Gatsby's dream is unrealistic because "it depends for its success upon Daisy's discontent with her marriage and her willingness to exchange it for a life of love.  But Daisy's discontent, like her sophistication, is a pose."(Aldridge 36)  The fact is, Daisy has almost all of the things that a woman could want out of a marriage.  She is very wealthy, she has a beautiful

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    Technology and Morals in Isben's An Enemy of the People and Freud's Civilization and its Discontents As technology increases do the morals of society degrade? This is a very scientific question to ask about quite an emotional subject. A scientist would ask for a set of data correlating points of increasing technology with corresponding points of moral standards. The brutal truth is that you can't know. No one can be certain about the moral standards of a people at a certain time in the past

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    Human Values Versus Technology in Beckett's Waiting for Godot and Freud's Civilization and its Discontents One of the most significant and wondrous features of today's society is the progress that has occurred with the passing of years and generations. Never before has humanity witnessed the technological advances that are now transpiring. Such advances encompass almost every facet of life as humanity knows it: from biomedical engineering to the exploration of outer-space. Science has proven

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