Aeschylus

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  • Aeschylus

    1818 Words  | 8 Pages

    Aeschylus was born in Eleusis, a Greek town near Athens, in 525 B.C. He was the first of the great Greek tragedians, preceding both Sophocles and Euripides, and is often credited with inventing tragic drama. Prior to Aeschylus, plays were primitive, consisting of a single actor and a chorus offering commentary. In his works, he added a "second actor" (often more than one) thus creating endless new dramatic possibilities. He lived until 456 B.C., fighting in the wars against Persia, and attaining

  • Language in Aeschylus

    1236 Words  | 5 Pages

    Language in Aeschylus Language is Aeschylus' juggernaut: he uses striking, innovative words to drive an image into the mind of his audience. Clytaemestra, notorious as a villain or perhaps an anti- heroine, effectively acts as a medium for Aeschylus’ brilliant rhetoric in Agamemnon. Clytaemestra’s rhetoric not only invokes vivid imagery, but also confuses and perverts spheres of logic and rhetoric: sacrifice with murder, liquids with cloth, and blood with wine. These images overturn the values

  • The Oresteia, Aeschylus

    870 Words  | 4 Pages

    In “The Oresteia” trilogy, the ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus advocates the importance of the male role in society over that of the female.  The entire trilogy can be seen as a subtle proclamation of the superiority of men over women. Yet, the women create the real interest in the plays.  Their characters are the impetus that makes everything occur. The most complex and compelling character in the three plays is Clytaemnestra.  Clytaemnestra is consumed with thoughts of revenge.  She seeks vengeance

  • The Agamemnon of Aeschylus

    1519 Words  | 7 Pages

    The Agamemnon of Aeschylus Prologue: The Watchman on the roof of the Palace of Agamemnon at Mycenae presents the facts. He has been watching a year for the fire signal that will announce Troy's capture, and all is not well within the house. He sees the beacon at last and will tell Clytemnestra, Agamemnon's wife. He rejoices at the news for it means his master will be coming home. Parodos or Entry of the Choros, who are Elders of Argos, counsellors to the Queen Regent. They chant about the

  • Agamemnon a Tragedy by Aeschylus

    1538 Words  | 7 Pages

    Aeschylus’ well-known tragedy of Agamemnon allows one to closely look at the treasured polytheistic religious ideas of Ancient Greece and how the Grecians relied heavily on the thought of free will versus fate determined by their gods. With the play being set and written in Greece, the polytheistic lifestyle is apparent and unabashed as the culture of the time would have seen the play to be easily believable; the entire audience would have been familiar with the various gods and goddesses as well

  • Justice and Aeschylus' Oresteia

    3391 Words  | 14 Pages

    Justice and Aeschylus' Oresteia At first glance, the picture of justice found in the Oresteia appears very different from that found in Heraclitus. And indeed, at the surface level there are a number of things which are distinctly un-Heraclitean. However, I believe that a close reading reveals more similarities than differences; and that there is a deep undercurrent of the Heraclitean world view running throughout the trilogy. In order to demonstrate this, I will first describe those ways

  • Review of Agamemnon by Aeschylus

    506 Words  | 3 Pages

    Review of Agamemnon by Aeschylus *No Works Cited The play Agamemnon, a Greek playwright written by Aeschylus, starts out after the fall of Troy at the palace of King Agamemnon. A watchman watching for a flare in the distance spots a light in the distance, signaling that the end of the war has finally come after many years. After the King comes home, the “chorus” (high authorities I think?) talks about the war and about the fact that it was fought over a woman. Around this time, the chorus is

  • Agamemnon by Aeschylus

    803 Words  | 4 Pages

    When Agamemnon was put in command he dropped all the friends he didn’t need, and shut himself in. He got what he wanted, and didn’t care about those around him that may have helped him. In this way he wants to be thought superior, and wont associate with any lesser people. Menelaos tries to be the bigger person and tells Agamemnon not to kill his child for his sake, making it seem like he’s doing him a favor. Clytemnestra wants to be there for her daughter’s supposed wedding, She wants to be the

  • Justice in Aeschylus' The Oresteia

    1534 Words  | 7 Pages

    Justice in Aeschylus' The Oresteia How can an endless and violently destructive cycle be just? The concept appears in places along the human timeline as diverse as the Bible and West Side Story. Why do people have a tendency to amplify and repeat violence through a cycle of murder and revenge, and how can this destructive process be called justice? In The Oresteia, the cycle is a familiar one, but is also interweaved with gender issues and a sense of justice that changes within the cycle itself

  • Cannibals and Vampires in Aeschylus and O'Neill

    944 Words  | 4 Pages

    Cannibals and Vampires in Aeschylus and O'Neill Aeschylus and Eugene O'Neill have populated their trilogies with cannibals and vampires. Family members feed off one another both literally and figuratively. For the houses of both Agamemnon and Ezra Mannon, this bloodlust is insatiable and inherited, an inescapable curse. A family curse provides the dramatic force necessary to push characters toward pivotal actions and events. At the conclusion of both trilogies the curse is finally broken (or at

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